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Open AccessArticle

Mode and Tempo of Microsatellite Evolution across 300 Million Years of Insect Evolution

1
Department of Biology, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
2
Genetics Interdisciplinary Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(8), 945; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080945
Received: 12 July 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 14 August 2020 / Published: 16 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Causes and Consequences of Chromosomal Aberrations)
Microsatellites are short, repetitive DNA sequences that can rapidly expand and contract due to slippage during DNA replication. Despite their impacts on transcription, genome structure, and disease, relatively little is known about the evolutionary dynamics of these short sequences across long evolutionary periods. To address this gap in our knowledge, we performed comparative analyses of 304 available insect genomes. We investigated the impact of sequence assembly methods and assembly quality on the inference of microsatellite content, and we explored the influence of chromosome type and number on the tempo and mode of microsatellite evolution across one of the most speciose clades on the planet. Diploid chromosome number had no impact on the rate of microsatellite evolution or the amount of microsatellite content in genomes. We found that centromere type (holocentric or monocentric) is not associated with a difference in the amount of microsatellite content; however, in those species with monocentric chromosomes, microsatellite content tends to evolve faster than in species with holocentric chromosomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: microsatellite evolution; insects; repetitive DNA; chromosome evolution; genome size; centromere microsatellite evolution; insects; repetitive DNA; chromosome evolution; genome size; centromere
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Jonika, M.; Lo, J.; Blackmon, H. Mode and Tempo of Microsatellite Evolution across 300 Million Years of Insect Evolution. Genes 2020, 11, 945.

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