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Open AccessArticle

Eosinophils and Neutrophils—Molecular Differences Revealed by Spontaneous Raman, CARS and Fluorescence Microscopy

1
Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 2, 30-387 Krakow, Poland
2
Jagiellonian Centre for Experimental Therapeutics (JCET), Jagiellonian University, Bobrzynskiego 14, 30-348 Krakow, Poland
3
Institute of Physical Chemistry (IPC) and Abbe Center of Photonics (ACP), Friedrich-Schiller-University, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena, Germany
4
Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology e.V. Member of Leibniz Health Technologies, Jena Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(9), 2041; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9092041
Received: 13 July 2020 / Revised: 3 September 2020 / Accepted: 4 September 2020 / Published: 7 September 2020
Leukocytes are a part of the immune system that plays an important role in the host’s defense against viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. Among the human leukocytes, two granulocytes, neutrophils (Ne) and eosinophils (EOS) play an important role in the innate immune system. For that purpose, eosinophils and neutrophils contain specific granules containing protoporphyrin-type proteins such as eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), respectively, which contribute directly to their anti-infection activity. Since both proteins are structurally and functionally different, they could potentially be a marker of both cells’ types. To prove this hypothesis, UV−Vis absorption spectroscopy and Raman imaging were applied to analyze EPO and MPO and their content in leukocytes isolated from the whole blood. Moreover, leukocytes can contain lipidic structures, called lipid bodies (LBs), which are linked to the regulation of immune responses and are considered to be a marker of cell inflammation. In this work, we showed how to determine the number of LBs in two types of granulocytes, EOS and Ne, using fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Spectroscopic differences of EPO and MPO can be used to identify these cells in blood samples, while the detection of LBs can indicate the cell inflammation process. View Full-Text
Keywords: eosinophils; neutrophils; eosinophil peroxidase; myeloperoxidase; lipid bodies; Raman microscopy; coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), fluorescence microscopy eosinophils; neutrophils; eosinophil peroxidase; myeloperoxidase; lipid bodies; Raman microscopy; coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), fluorescence microscopy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dorosz, A.; Grosicki, M.; Dybas, J.; Matuszyk, E.; Rodewald, M.; Meyer, T.; Popp, J.; Malek, K.; Baranska, M. Eosinophils and Neutrophils—Molecular Differences Revealed by Spontaneous Raman, CARS and Fluorescence Microscopy. Cells 2020, 9, 2041.

AMA Style

Dorosz A, Grosicki M, Dybas J, Matuszyk E, Rodewald M, Meyer T, Popp J, Malek K, Baranska M. Eosinophils and Neutrophils—Molecular Differences Revealed by Spontaneous Raman, CARS and Fluorescence Microscopy. Cells. 2020; 9(9):2041.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dorosz, Aleksandra; Grosicki, Marek; Dybas, Jakub; Matuszyk, Ewelina; Rodewald, Marko; Meyer, Tobias; Popp, Jürgen; Malek, Kamilla; Baranska, Malgorzata. 2020. "Eosinophils and Neutrophils—Molecular Differences Revealed by Spontaneous Raman, CARS and Fluorescence Microscopy" Cells 9, no. 9: 2041.

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