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Yeast as a Model to Understand Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions in Mammals—Illustrated with Four Actin Cytoskeleton Proteins

1
School of Medical Science, Gold Coast campus, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222, Australia
2
Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Génétique Moléculaire Génomique Microbiologie GMGM UMR 7156, F-67000 Strasbourg, France
3
Department of Mechanistic Cell Biology Max-Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Dortmund 44227, Germany
4
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo 04023-062, Brazil
5
School of Natural and Computational Sciences, Massey University, P.O. Box 102 904, North Shore Mail Centre, Albany, Auckland 0745, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this paper.
Cells 2020, 9(3), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030672
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 5 March 2020 / Accepted: 5 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has an actin cytoskeleton that comprises a set of protein components analogous to those found in the actin cytoskeletons of higher eukaryotes. Furthermore, the actin cytoskeletons of S. cerevisiae and of higher eukaryotes have some similar physiological roles. The genetic tractability of budding yeast and the availability of a stable haploid cell type facilitates the application of molecular genetic approaches to assign functions to the various actin cytoskeleton components. This has provided information that is in general complementary to that provided by studies of the equivalent proteins of higher eukaryotes and hence has enabled a more complete view of the role of these proteins. Several human functional homologues of yeast actin effectors are implicated in diseases. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the functions of these proteins is critical to develop improved therapeutic strategies. In this article we chose as examples four evolutionarily conserved proteins that associate with the actin cytoskeleton: (1) yeast Hof1p/mammalian PSTPIP1, (2) yeast Rvs167p/mammalian BIN1, (3) yeast eEF1A/eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 and (4) yeast Yih1p/mammalian IMPACT. We compare the knowledge on the functions of these actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins that has arisen from studies of their homologues in yeast with information that has been obtained from in vivo studies using live animals or in vitro studies using cultured animal cell lines. View Full-Text
Keywords: BAR domain; cancer; cytokinesis; endocytosis; F-BAR domain; Myc; translation factors; tumor suppressor; WASP; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome BAR domain; cancer; cytokinesis; endocytosis; F-BAR domain; Myc; translation factors; tumor suppressor; WASP; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Akram, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Mack, H.; Kaur, R.; Silva, R.C.; Castilho, B.A.; Friant, S.; Sattlegger, E.; Munn, A.L. Yeast as a Model to Understand Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions in Mammals—Illustrated with Four Actin Cytoskeleton Proteins. Cells 2020, 9, 672. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030672

AMA Style

Akram Z, Ahmed I, Mack H, Kaur R, Silva RC, Castilho BA, Friant S, Sattlegger E, Munn AL. Yeast as a Model to Understand Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions in Mammals—Illustrated with Four Actin Cytoskeleton Proteins. Cells. 2020; 9(3):672. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030672

Chicago/Turabian Style

Akram, Zain, Ishtiaq Ahmed, Heike Mack, Ramandeep Kaur, Richard C. Silva, Beatriz A. Castilho, Sylvie Friant, Evelyn Sattlegger, and Alan L. Munn. 2020. "Yeast as a Model to Understand Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions in Mammals—Illustrated with Four Actin Cytoskeleton Proteins" Cells 9, no. 3: 672. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030672

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