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Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
2
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
3
Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
4
London Regional Cancer Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6A 5W9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2019, 8(6), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8060559
Received: 16 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 8 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuclear Transport in Ageing and Diseases)
Protein nuclear transport is an integral process to many cellular pathways and often plays a critical role during viral infection. To overcome the barrier presented by the nuclear membrane and gain access to the nucleus, virally encoded proteins have evolved ways to appropriate components of the nuclear transport machinery. By binding karyopherins, or the nuclear pore complex, viral proteins influence their own transport as well as the transport of key cellular regulatory proteins. This review covers how viral proteins can interact with different components of the nuclear import machinery and how this influences viral replicative cycles. We also highlight the effects that viral perturbation of nuclear transport has on the infected host and how we can exploit viruses as tools to study novel mechanisms of protein nuclear import. Finally, we discuss the possibility that drugs targeting these transport pathways could be repurposed for treating viral infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: virus; nuclear transport; protein localization; infection; antiviral agents; viral mimicry virus; nuclear transport; protein localization; infection; antiviral agents; viral mimicry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tessier, T.M.; Dodge, M.J.; Prusinkiewicz, M.A.; Mymryk, J.S. Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery. Cells 2019, 8, 559.

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