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Altered Cytokine Response of Human Brain Endothelial Cells after Stimulation with Malaria Patient Plasma

1
Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, 20359 Hamburg, Germany
2
Department of Molecular Physiology, Kiel University, 24118 Kiel, Germany
3
Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), 24118 Kiel, Germany
4
Department of Biology, University of Hamburg, 20148 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Contributed equally.
Academic Editor: Andreas Fischer
Cells 2021, 10(7), 1656; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10071656
Received: 23 April 2021 / Revised: 27 June 2021 / Accepted: 28 June 2021 / Published: 1 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Cellular Immunology)
Infections with the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, are accompanied by a strong immunological response of the human host. To date, more than 30 cytokines have been detected in elevated levels in plasma of malaria patients compared to healthy controls. Endothelial cells (ECs) are a potential source of these cytokines, but so far it is not known if their cytokine secretion depends on the direct contact of the P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs) with ECs in terms of cytoadhesion. Culturing ECs with plasma from malaria patients (27 returning travellers) resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-11, CXCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) if compared to matching controls (22 healthy individuals). The accompanying transcriptome study of the ECs identified 43 genes that were significantly increased in expression (≥1.7 fold) after co-incubation with malaria patient plasma, including cxcl5 and angptl4. Further bioinformatic analyses revealed that biological processes such as cell migration, cell proliferation and tube development were particularly affected in these ECs. It can thus be postulated that not only the cytoadhesion of IEs, but also molecules in the plasma of malaria patients exerts an influence on ECs, and that not only the immunological response but also other processes, such as angiogenesis, are altered. View Full-Text
Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum; malaria; endothelial cells; cytokines Plasmodium falciparum; malaria; endothelial cells; cytokines
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MDPI and ACS Style

Raacke, M.; Kerr, A.; Dörpinghaus, M.; Brehmer, J.; Wu, Y.; Lorenzen, S.; Fink, C.; Jacobs, T.; Roeder, T.; Sellau, J.; Bachmann, A.; Metwally, N.G.; Bruchhaus, I. Altered Cytokine Response of Human Brain Endothelial Cells after Stimulation with Malaria Patient Plasma. Cells 2021, 10, 1656. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10071656

AMA Style

Raacke M, Kerr A, Dörpinghaus M, Brehmer J, Wu Y, Lorenzen S, Fink C, Jacobs T, Roeder T, Sellau J, Bachmann A, Metwally NG, Bruchhaus I. Altered Cytokine Response of Human Brain Endothelial Cells after Stimulation with Malaria Patient Plasma. Cells. 2021; 10(7):1656. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10071656

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raacke, Michaela, Amy Kerr, Michael Dörpinghaus, Jana Brehmer, Yifan Wu, Stephan Lorenzen, Christine Fink, Thomas Jacobs, Thomas Roeder, Julie Sellau, Anna Bachmann, Nahla G. Metwally, and Iris Bruchhaus. 2021. "Altered Cytokine Response of Human Brain Endothelial Cells after Stimulation with Malaria Patient Plasma" Cells 10, no. 7: 1656. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10071656

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