Next Article in Journal
Optimization of Herbicide Use: Study on Spreading and Evaporation Characteristics of Glyphosate-Organic Silicone Mixture Droplets on Weed Leaves
Next Article in Special Issue
Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Improves Rhizobium–Glycyrrhiza Seedling Symbiosis under Drought Stress
Previous Article in Journal
Regulation of Spraying 6-BA in the Late Jointing Stage on the Fertile Floret Development and Grain Setting in Winter Wheat
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Salinity Stress and Microbial Inoculations on Glomalin Production and Plant Growth Parameters of Snap Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

Department of Earth and Environment, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(9), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090545
Received: 9 August 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizobium–Legume Symbiosis)
Salinity is a major abiotic stress that can adversely affect plant growth, yield, other physiological parameters, and soil health. Salinity stress on biomass production of salt-sensitive crops, like snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is a serious problem, and specifically in South Florida, USA, where saline soils can be found in major agricultural lands. Research studies focused on the ‘snap bean–Rhizobium–arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF)’ relationship under salinity stress are limited, and fewer studies have evaluated how this tripartite symbiosis affects glomalin production (GRSP), a glycoprotein released by AMF. A shade house experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of three microbial inoculations (IC = inoculation control; IT1 = AMF and IT2 = AMF + Rhizobium) on three salinity treatments (SC = salinity control 0.6 dS m−1, S1 = 1.0 dS m−1, and S2 = 2.0 dS m−1) on snap bean growth and yield. Our results indicate that S2 reduced 20% bean biomass production, 11% plant height, 13% root weight, and 23% AMF root colonization. However, microbial inoculations increased 26% bean yield over different salinity treatments. Maximum salinity stress (S2) increased 6% and 18% GRSP production than S1 and SC, respectively, indicating the relative advantage of abiotic stress on AMF’s role in soil. Dual inoculation (IT2) demonstrated a beneficial role on all physiological parameters, biomass production, and GRSP synthesis compared to single inoculation (IT1) treatment with all three salinity levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil salinity; glomalin; microbial inoculation; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; rhizobium; soil health; snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) soil salinity; glomalin; microbial inoculation; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; rhizobium; soil health; snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Garcia, C.L.; Dattamudi, S.; Chanda, S.; Jayachandran, K. Effect of Salinity Stress and Microbial Inoculations on Glomalin Production and Plant Growth Parameters of Snap Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Agronomy 2019, 9, 545. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090545

AMA Style

Garcia CL, Dattamudi S, Chanda S, Jayachandran K. Effect of Salinity Stress and Microbial Inoculations on Glomalin Production and Plant Growth Parameters of Snap Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Agronomy. 2019; 9(9):545. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090545

Chicago/Turabian Style

Garcia, Claudia L.; Dattamudi, Sanku; Chanda, Saoli; Jayachandran, Krishnaswamy. 2019. "Effect of Salinity Stress and Microbial Inoculations on Glomalin Production and Plant Growth Parameters of Snap Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)" Agronomy 9, no. 9: 545. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090545

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop