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Effect of Salinity and Water Stress on the Essential Oil Components of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.)

1
Ecole Nationale Supérieure Agronomique, Département de Zoologie Agricole et Forestière, Algiers 16000, Algeria
2
Laboratoire de Biotechnologie des Productions Végétales, Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université de Blida 1, Blida 09000, Algeria
3
Laboratoires Agronutrition SAS, 3 allée de l’Orchidée, 31390 Carbonne, France
4
Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-industrielle (LCA), Université de Toulouse, INRA, INPT, 31030 Toulouse, France
5
Université Paul Sabatier, IUT A, Département Génie Biologique, 24 rue d’Embaquès 32000 Auch, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(5), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9050214
Received: 15 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
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Abstract

The effect of salinity and water stresses on the essential oil components of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil was investigated. Rosemary plants were submitted to different water treatments: tap water (TW), salt water (SW) and without irrigation (NIR). GC/MS analysis showed that ten and eleven volatile compounds were identified in essential oil of rosemary plants irrigated with tap water (TW) and salt water (SW), respectively. However, thirteen volatile compounds were identified in essential oil of non-irrigated plants (NIR). Moreover, among these compounds, α-Pinene, Eucalyptol (1,8 Cineol), Camphene, Borneol, D-verbenone, Bornyl acetate were the major components of oil. Also, GC/MS results highlighted that non-irrigated rosemary plants showed the highest essential oil yield (Y). Obtained oil yields followed the order YNIR > YTW > YSW. In conclusion, qualitative and quantitative differences in rosemary essential oil components were highlighted in relation to water stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rosmarinus officinalis; water stress; salinity; essential oil; terpennoids Rosmarinus officinalis; water stress; salinity; essential oil; terpennoids
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Sarmoum, R.; Haid, S.; Biche, M.; Djazouli, Z.; Zebib, B.; Merah, O. Effect of Salinity and Water Stress on the Essential Oil Components of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.). Agronomy 2019, 9, 214.

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