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Screening for Changes on Iris germanica L. Rhizomes Following Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

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Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur Street No. 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
2
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur Street No. 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
3
Department of Biophysics, Life Sciences Institute “King Michael I of Romania”, Manastur Street No. 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(12), 815; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9120815
Received: 3 November 2019 / Revised: 24 November 2019 / Accepted: 26 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis to Crop Growth)
Iris germanica L. is an ornamental and medicinal plant used since ancient times for their rhizomes, still utilized today to obtain orris butter highly valued in perfumery. Iris germanica presents special root adaptations, which confers certain tolerance to water and salt stress, making it a good option in the context of the current climate trend. Aim of this study was to prospect the potential for biofortification of rhizomes using commercial arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) application in field conditions for six Iris germanica cultivars. Plants presented Paris-type AM colonization. Rhizome samples collected after nine months from treatment and maturated, presented FT-IR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) spectra variation between experimental variants. Presence of the main metabolites in rhizome could be confirmed based on literature. Screening focused on two rhizome quality markers: carbohydrates, which influence plant development, and fatty acids, which are extractable from rhizome. Results suggest potential to enhance their accumulation in certain cultivars, such as ‘Pinafore Pink’ following AM application. View Full-Text
Keywords: Glomeromycota; biotroph; plant metabolites; quality marker; spectroscopy Glomeromycota; biotroph; plant metabolites; quality marker; spectroscopy
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Crișan, I.; Vidican, R.; Olar, L.; Stoian, V.; Morea, A.; Ștefan, R. Screening for Changes on Iris germanica L. Rhizomes Following Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Agronomy 2019, 9, 815.

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