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Open AccessArticle

Nitrogen Nutrition Optimization in Organic Greenhouse Tomato Through the Use of Legume Plants as Green Manure or Intercrops

1
Laboratory of Vegetable Crops, Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
2
Institute of Plant Breeding and Genetic Resources ELGO-DEMETER, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece
3
Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences, University of Torino, 10095 Grugliasco (TO), Italy
4
Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of General and Agricultural Microbiology, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
5
Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Agricultural Zoology and Entomology, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(11), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110766
Received: 15 October 2019 / Revised: 12 November 2019 / Accepted: 13 November 2019 / Published: 17 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nitrogen Fertilization in Vegetable Crops)
In the present study, in addition to farmyard manure (FYM), cowpea was applied as green manure and faba bean as an intercrop in an organic greenhouse tomato crop, aiming to increase the levels of soil N. Three experiments (E1, E2, E3) were carried out, in which legumes were either noninoculated or inoculated with rhizobia alone or together with plant growth, promoting rhizobacteria. Inoculation of legumes with rhizobia considerably increased N2 fixation in E1 but had no impact on N2 fixation in E2 and E3. In E1, the application of cowpea decreased yield because it imposed a stronger nematode infection as the cowpea plants acted as a good host for Meloidogyne. However, in E2 and E3 the nematode infection was successfully controlled and the legumes significantly increased the tomato yield when inoculated in E2, irrespective of legume inoculation in E3. The total N concentration in the tomato plant tissues was significantly increased by legume application in E2 and E3, but not in E1. These results show that legumes applied as green manure can successfully complement N supply via FYM in organic greenhouse tomato, while legume inoculation with rhizobia can increase the amounts of nitrogen provided to the crop via green manure. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cowpea; faba bean; BNF; organic; rhizobia; PGPR; root-knot nematodes Cowpea; faba bean; BNF; organic; rhizobia; PGPR; root-knot nematodes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gatsios, A.; Ntatsi, G.; Celi, L.; Said-Pullicino, D.; Tampakaki, A.; Giannakou, I.; Savvas, D. Nitrogen Nutrition Optimization in Organic Greenhouse Tomato Through the Use of Legume Plants as Green Manure or Intercrops. Agronomy 2019, 9, 766. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110766

AMA Style

Gatsios A, Ntatsi G, Celi L, Said-Pullicino D, Tampakaki A, Giannakou I, Savvas D. Nitrogen Nutrition Optimization in Organic Greenhouse Tomato Through the Use of Legume Plants as Green Manure or Intercrops. Agronomy. 2019; 9(11):766. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110766

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gatsios, Anastasios; Ntatsi, Georgia; Celi, Luisella; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Tampakaki, Anastasia; Giannakou, Ioannis; Savvas, Dimitrios. 2019. "Nitrogen Nutrition Optimization in Organic Greenhouse Tomato Through the Use of Legume Plants as Green Manure or Intercrops" Agronomy 9, no. 11: 766. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110766

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