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Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070111

Response of Bell Pepper to Rootstock and Greenhouse Cultivation in Coconut Fiber or Soil

1
Department of Horticulture, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Calzada Antonio Narro 1923, Saltillo 25315, Coahuila, Mexico
2
Department of Plant Breeding, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Calzada Antonio Narro 1923, Saltillo 25315, Coahuila, Mexico
3
Department of Botany, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Calzada Antonio Narro 1923, Saltillo 25315, Coahuila, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 May 2018 / Revised: 23 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics of Tomato and Solanaceae)
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Abstract

Vegetable production in greenhouses is preferred when soil quality is degraded by high salinity or incidence of pests and diseases. In these soils with abiotic and biotic issues, it is a challenge to increase the yield and quality of fruits. The use of rootstocks and organic substrates are effective and environmentally friendly techniques to solve that challenge. The objective was to study the effect of rootstocks on yields and quality in bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) grown in either soil or coconut fiber substrate, in greenhouses. Using a randomized block design with three repetitions, the resulting treatment groups consisted of three rootstocks (Foundation-F1, Yaocali-F1, CLX-PTX991-F1 (Ultron), and non-grafted controls) with four hybrids as scions (Lamborghini, Bambuca, DiCaprio, and Ucumari). The yield of fruit per plant (YFP) and number of fruit per plant (NFP) obtained in coconut fiber were 85% and 55% greater, respectively, than in soil. The CLX-PTX991-F1 rootstock was superior to the hybrids without rootstock (p ≤ 0.05) in YFP and NPF (30% and 19.5%, respectively). The Lamborghini hybrid had significantly greater YFP and NFP than the Ucumari. We concluded that the use of coconut fiber significantly improves the yields of bell pepper and that the use of rootstock improves plant vigor and plant yield. View Full-Text
Keywords: Capsicum annuum; graft; organic substrates; fruit quality; yields Capsicum annuum; graft; organic substrates; fruit quality; yields
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Camposeco-Montejo, N.; Robledo-Torres, V.; Ramírez-Godina, F.; Mendoza-Villarreal, R.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.Á.; Cabrera-de la Fuente, M. Response of Bell Pepper to Rootstock and Greenhouse Cultivation in Coconut Fiber or Soil. Agronomy 2018, 8, 111.

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