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Agronomy 2018, 8(6), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8060090

Seed Yield and Water Productivity of Irrigated Winter Canola (Brassica napus L.) under Semiarid Climate and High Elevation

1
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, P.O. Box 1018, Farmington, NM 87499, USA
2
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University, Agricultural Science Center at Clovis, Clovis, NM 88101, USA
3
ADA Consulting Africa, 07 BP 14284 Lomé, Togo
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 26 May 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
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Abstract

Canola is a cash crop produced for its highly-valued seed, and as a protein source for animal feed. While winter canola is produced mainly in the high plains, it is expanding to new environments, and is greatly incorporated into crop systems with advantages in terms of increasing crop yield and improving soil health. The objectives of this study were to evaluate eight winter canola genotypes for seed yield, and to determine their water productivity under semiarid climates and high elevations in the Four Corners region at Farmington, New Mexico. A field experiment was conducted at the New Mexico State Agricultural Science Center at Farmington for five growing seasons. Eight genotypes of winter canola (Baldur, Flash, Safran, Sitro, Virginia, Visby, Wichita, and Sumner) were arranged into the randomized complete block design. The field was fully irrigated with a center pivot irrigation system. Results showed that winter canola seed yield was dependent on genotype, varying from 2393 to 5717 kg/ha. The highest yield was achieved by Sitro, and the lowest yield by Sumner. There was inter-annual variation in canola nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), irrigation water-use efficiency (IWUE), and crop water-use efficiency (CWUE). NUE varied from 12.9 to 50.4 kg seed/kg N, with the highest NUE achieved by Sitro, and the lowest by Sumner. IWUE varied from 0.34 to 0.80 kg/m3, and canola CWUE from 0.28 to 0.69 kg/m3. The highest water productivity was achieved by Sitro. The results of this study showed full assessment of canola production under the semiarid climate in the Four Corners region, and could improve crop productivity and profitability. View Full-Text
Keywords: winter canola; seed yield; irrigation; water productivity; semiarid climate; high elevation winter canola; seed yield; irrigation; water productivity; semiarid climate; high elevation
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Djaman, K.; O’Neill, M.; Owen, C.; Smeal, D.; West, M.; Begay, D.; Angadi, S.V.; Koudahe, K.; Allen, S.; Lombard, K. Seed Yield and Water Productivity of Irrigated Winter Canola (Brassica napus L.) under Semiarid Climate and High Elevation. Agronomy 2018, 8, 90.

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