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Agronomy 2018, 8(11), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8110261

Green Manuring Effect on Changes of Soil Nitrogen Fractions, Maize Growth, and Nutrient Uptake

1
Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
2
Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs/Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
3
Institute of Soil & Fertilizer and Resources & Environment, Jiangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanchang 330200, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 8 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fertilizer Application on Crop Yield)
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Abstract

Green manure is a promising, at least partial, substitution for chemical fertilizer in agriculture, especially for nitrogen (N), which in soil can be radically changed by exogenous input. However, it is not well understood how, after green manure incorporation, soil N changes coordinate with crop N uptake and consequently contribute to fertilizer reduction in a maize–green manure rotation. A four-year field study was performed consisting of (1) control, no fertilization; (2) F100, recommended inorganic fertilization alone; (3) G, green manure incorporation alone; (4) F70 + G (70% of F100 plus G); (5) F85 + G; and (6) F100 + G. The results show that treatments with 15–30% reduction of inorganic fertilizer (i.e., F70 + G and F85 + G) had similar grain yield, dry matter (DM) accumulation, and N uptake as F100 treatment. F100 + G maize had 17% greater DM and 15% more N uptake at maturity relative to F100. Of the five soil N fractions examined, dissolved organic N (DON) and mineral N (Nmin) explained over 70% of the variation of maize DM and N accumulation. Partial least squares path modeling further revealed that soil N fractions had positive indirect effects on DM production through N uptake, which might be coordinated with improved DON and Nmin status at both early and mid-late stages of maize growth. Overall, the results highlight enhanced maize production with reduced fertilizer inputs based on green manure incorporation in temperate regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: green manure; nitrogen uptake; Orychophragmus violaceus L.; soil nitrogen pools; grain yield; Zea mays L. green manure; nitrogen uptake; Orychophragmus violaceus L.; soil nitrogen pools; grain yield; Zea mays L.
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Yang, L.; Bai, J.; Liu, J.; Zeng, N.; Cao, W. Green Manuring Effect on Changes of Soil Nitrogen Fractions, Maize Growth, and Nutrient Uptake. Agronomy 2018, 8, 261.

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