Next Article in Journal
The Modulation of Auxin-Responsive Genes, Phytohormone Profile, and Metabolomic Signature in Leaves of Tomato Cuttings Is Specifically Modulated by Different Protein Hydrolysates
Next Article in Special Issue
Survey of Sugarcane Yellow Leaf Virus in the Canal Point Breeding and Cultivar Development Program
Previous Article in Journal
Biostimulant Effects of Cerium on Seed Germination and Initial Growth of Tomato Seedlings
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prediction of Ratoon Sugarcane Family Yield and Selection Using Remote Imagery
Article

Crop Nutrition and Yield Response of Bagasse Application on Sugarcane Grown on a Mineral Soil

1
Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL 33430, USA
2
Everglades Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL 33430, USA
3
IFAS Extension, University of Florida, LaBelle, FL 33935, USA
4
Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL 33430, USA
5
Tropical Research and Education Center, Soil and Water Sciences Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031, USA
6
Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 34142, USA
7
Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Md Sariful Islam
Agronomy 2021, 11(8), 1526; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081526
Received: 28 June 2021 / Revised: 27 July 2021 / Accepted: 28 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
The addition of agricultural by-products to mineral soils has the potential to improve crop production. This study aimed to determine the effects of the readily available sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) milling by-product bagasse as a soil amendment on yields of sugarcane grown on a sandy Entisol of South Florida. The field trial was conducted on a commercial sugarcane farm for three annual crop cycles (plant cane and two ratoons). Four treatments including 5 cm bagasse (85 ton ha−1); 10 cm bagasse (170 ton ha−1); 10 cm bagasse (170 ton ha−1) plus 336 kg ha−1 ammonium nitrate; and a control (without bagasse and ammonium nitrate) were evaluated. Results indicate that one single application of bagasse increased sugarcane biomass and sugar yield by approximately 23% in the plant cane year. A higher application rate of bagasse (10 cm of bagasse) was recommended since it had a longer effect on increasing sugarcane biomass and sugar yield. Bagasse application enhanced silicon (Si) supply and increased Si plant nutrition. However, the effects of bagasse on the other leaf nutrients were not significant. View Full-Text
Keywords: bagasse; leaf nutrient analysis; mineral soils; sugarcane production bagasse; leaf nutrient analysis; mineral soils; sugarcane production
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, N.; Bhadha, J.H.; Rabbany, A.; Swanson, S.; McCray, J.M.; Li, Y.C.; Strauss, S.L.; Mylavarapu, R. Crop Nutrition and Yield Response of Bagasse Application on Sugarcane Grown on a Mineral Soil. Agronomy 2021, 11, 1526. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081526

AMA Style

Xu N, Bhadha JH, Rabbany A, Swanson S, McCray JM, Li YC, Strauss SL, Mylavarapu R. Crop Nutrition and Yield Response of Bagasse Application on Sugarcane Grown on a Mineral Soil. Agronomy. 2021; 11(8):1526. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081526

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Nan, Jehangir H. Bhadha, Abul Rabbany, Stewart Swanson, James M. McCray, Yuncong C. Li, Sarah L. Strauss, and Rao Mylavarapu. 2021. "Crop Nutrition and Yield Response of Bagasse Application on Sugarcane Grown on a Mineral Soil" Agronomy 11, no. 8: 1526. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081526

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop