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Genotype X Environment Response of ‘Matooke’ Hybrids (Naritas) to Pseudocercospora fijiensis, the Cause of Black Sigatoka in Banana

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International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, P.O. Box 7878-10301, Kampala, Uganda
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Department of Plant Pathology, Stellenbosch University, Matieland 7602, South Africa
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International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria
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Bioversity International, P.O. Box 24384, Kampala, Uganda
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Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Agricultural Sciences in the Tropics (Hans-Ruthenberg-Institute), University of Hohenheim, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Nelson Mandela Road, Arusha, Tanzania
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Laboratory of Tropical Crop Improvement, KU Leuven, Willem De Croylaan 42, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), P.O. Box 34443, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tito Caffi
Agronomy 2021, 11(6), 1145; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11061145
Received: 25 February 2021 / Revised: 26 May 2021 / Accepted: 27 May 2021 / Published: 3 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Pest and Disease Management)
Growing bananas resistant to Pseudocercospora fijiensis, the cause of black Sigatoka, is the preferred disease control strategy for resource-poor farmers. Banana breeding programs in east Africa have developed 27 Matooke hybrids (commonly known as NARITAs) with higher yields than local landraces. To assess the response of NARITA hybrids to P. fijiensis, 22 hybrids were evaluated under natural field conditions in four locations—Kawanda and Mbarara in Uganda, and Maruku, and Mitarula in Tanzania—between 2016 and 2018 for three crop cycles. Black Sigatoka was visually assessed and the area under the disease progress curve calculated for each plant over time. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed between genotypes, environments, and their interaction. The highest contributor to black Sigatoka severity (39.1%) was the environment, followed by the genotype (37.5%) and the genotype Χ environment interaction (GEI) (23.4%). NARITA 2, 7, 14, 21 and 23 were resistant and the most stable hybrids across locations. If other attributes such as the yield and taste are acceptable to end-users, these hybrids can be released to farmers in the region to replace highly susceptible landraces. Mitarula was identified as an ideal site for evaluating banana against black Sigatoka and should be used as a representative location to minimize costs of disease evaluations. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sigatoka; east African highland bananas (EAHB), NARITAs; stability; genotype by environment interaction (GEI) Sigatoka; east African highland bananas (EAHB), NARITAs; stability; genotype by environment interaction (GEI)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kimunye, J.; Jomanga, K.; Tazuba, A.F.; Were, E.; Viljoen, A.; Swennen, R.; Mahuku, G. Genotype X Environment Response of ‘Matooke’ Hybrids (Naritas) to Pseudocercospora fijiensis, the Cause of Black Sigatoka in Banana. Agronomy 2021, 11, 1145. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11061145

AMA Style

Kimunye J, Jomanga K, Tazuba AF, Were E, Viljoen A, Swennen R, Mahuku G. Genotype X Environment Response of ‘Matooke’ Hybrids (Naritas) to Pseudocercospora fijiensis, the Cause of Black Sigatoka in Banana. Agronomy. 2021; 11(6):1145. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11061145

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kimunye, Janet, Kennedy Jomanga, Anthony F. Tazuba, Evans Were, Altus Viljoen, Rony Swennen, and George Mahuku. 2021. "Genotype X Environment Response of ‘Matooke’ Hybrids (Naritas) to Pseudocercospora fijiensis, the Cause of Black Sigatoka in Banana" Agronomy 11, no. 6: 1145. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11061145

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