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Article

Interseeding Camelina and Rye in Soybean with Varying Maturity Provides Soil Cover without Affecting Soybean Yield

Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58104, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Umberto Anastasi and Aurelio Scavo
Agronomy 2021, 11(2), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11020353
Received: 24 January 2021 / Revised: 12 February 2021 / Accepted: 13 February 2021 / Published: 16 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cropping Systems and Agronomic Management Practices of Field Crops)
Low adoption to utilize cover crops interseeded into soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), in the northern Plains in the USA, is due to a short growing season and a few adapted winter-hardy species. The objective was to evaluate the impact of interseeded winter camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) and winter rye (Secale cereale L.) using different soybean relative maturities on soybean yield, canopy coverage, spring cover crop biomass, and subsequent wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yield. Cover crops interseeded into early-maturing (0.4–0.8) soybean cultivars had more fall coverage compared with the 0.9 maturity cultivar, but the spring biomass was similar for all maturities. The soybean yield of the 0.9 cultivar was significantly higher, 2365 kg ha−1 compared with 2037 kg ha−1 for the 0.4 cultivar. Rye outperformed winter camelina and had higher fall canopy cover (15 vs. 7%), spring canopy cover (16% vs. 4%), and higher spring biomass (313 vs. 100 kg ha−1 dry matter). Spring wheat, after rye, yielded 90% of the check. It is not recommended to plant spring wheat following winter rye, but there was no negative yield effect from winter camelina. Interseeding cover crops into soybean in the northern Plains is possible but needs further research to optimize interseeding systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: cover crop; canopy cover; wheat; winter survival cover crop; canopy cover; wheat; winter survival
MDPI and ACS Style

Johnson, K.L.; Kandel, H.J.; Samarappuli, D.P.; Berti, M.T. Interseeding Camelina and Rye in Soybean with Varying Maturity Provides Soil Cover without Affecting Soybean Yield. Agronomy 2021, 11, 353. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11020353

AMA Style

Johnson KL, Kandel HJ, Samarappuli DP, Berti MT. Interseeding Camelina and Rye in Soybean with Varying Maturity Provides Soil Cover without Affecting Soybean Yield. Agronomy. 2021; 11(2):353. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11020353

Chicago/Turabian Style

Johnson, Kory L., Hans J. Kandel, Dulan P. Samarappuli, and Marisol T. Berti. 2021. "Interseeding Camelina and Rye in Soybean with Varying Maturity Provides Soil Cover without Affecting Soybean Yield" Agronomy 11, no. 2: 353. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11020353

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