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Article

Volatile Profiling of Fifteen Willow Species and Hybrids and Their Responses to Giant Willow Aphid Infestation

1
Wildlife and Ecology Group, School of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North 4410, New Zealand
2
Plant & Food Research, Fitzherbert Science Centre, Batchelar Road, Palmerston North 4410, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1404; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091404
Received: 6 August 2020 / Revised: 10 September 2020 / Accepted: 14 September 2020 / Published: 16 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiochemicals in Pest Management)
The giant willow aphid (Tuberolachnus salignus) is a large stem-feeding insect which forms dense colonies on infested plants. Since T. salignus is a new invasive species in New Zealand, we have a poor understanding of the plant chemical responses to aphid infestation. This study aimed to characterize the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions of fifteen different willow species and hybrids growing in New Zealand, and to evaluate changes in response to T. salignus attack in a field trial. Volatiles were collected using a headspace sampling technique and analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). We found high variability in the volatile profiles of different species and hybrids, with (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and (E)-β-ocimene being the only common components to all blends. Taxonomically related plants showed an overlapping pattern of VOC emission, and there seemed to be a clear separation between shrub and tree willows. Responses to aphid infestation were variable, with only four species/hybrids showing changes in their total VOC emission, or that of at least one class of VOCs. A weak positive correlation between aphid population estimates and VOC emissions suggests that responses are species-specific and not infestation-dependent. These results reveal useful information about the interaction between T. salignus and its potential host plants for biological control and pest management purposes. View Full-Text
Keywords: Salix; Tuberolachnus salignus; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); plant-insect interactions; herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) Salix; Tuberolachnus salignus; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); plant-insect interactions; herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tun, K.M.; Minor, M.; Jones, T.; McCormick, A.C. Volatile Profiling of Fifteen Willow Species and Hybrids and Their Responses to Giant Willow Aphid Infestation. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1404. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091404

AMA Style

Tun KM, Minor M, Jones T, McCormick AC. Volatile Profiling of Fifteen Willow Species and Hybrids and Their Responses to Giant Willow Aphid Infestation. Agronomy. 2020; 10(9):1404. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091404

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tun, Kyaw M., Maria Minor, Trevor Jones, and Andrea C. McCormick 2020. "Volatile Profiling of Fifteen Willow Species and Hybrids and Their Responses to Giant Willow Aphid Infestation" Agronomy 10, no. 9: 1404. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091404

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