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Article

Evaluation of Glycine max and Glycine soja for Resistance to Calonectria ilicicola

1
Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Tsukuba 305-8602, Japan
2
Research Center for Agricultural Information Technology, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Tsukuba 305-8602, Japan
3
Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Tsukuba 305-8602, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 887; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060887
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 3 June 2020 / Accepted: 19 June 2020 / Published: 22 June 2020
Breeding for resistance to soybean red crown rot (Calonectria ilicicola) has long been hampered by the lack of genetic sources of adequate levels of resistance to use as parents. Mini core collections of soybean (Glycine max) originating from Japan (79 accessions), from around the world (80 accessions), and a collection of wild soybeans (Glycine soja) consisting 54 accessions were evaluated for resistance to C. ilicicola (isolate UH2-1). In the first two sets, average disease severity scores of 4.2 ± 0.28 and 4.6 ± 0.31 on a rating scale from zero for no symptom to 5.0 for seedling death were recorded from the set from Japan and the world. No high levels of resistance were observed in these two sets. On the other hand, disease severity score of 3.8 ± 0.35 for the wild soybean accessions was somewhat lower and exhibited higher levels of resistance compared to the soybean cultivars. Three accessions in the wild soybean collection (Gs-7, Gs-9, and Gs-27) had disease severity score ≤2.5 and showed >70% reduction in fungal growth in the roots compared to soybean control cv. “Enrei”. Further analysis using 10 C. ilicicola isolates revealed that accession Gs-9 overall had a wide range of resistance to all isolates tested, with 37% to 93% reduction in fungal growth relative to the cv. Enrei. These highly resistant wild soybean lines may serve as valuable genetic resources for developing C. ilicicola-resistant soybean cultivars. View Full-Text
Keywords: soybean; wild soybean; Calonectria ilicicola; red crown rot; resistance soybean; wild soybean; Calonectria ilicicola; red crown rot; resistance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, C.-J.; Sugano, S.; Ochi, S.; Kaga, A.; Ishimoto, M. Evaluation of Glycine max and Glycine soja for Resistance to Calonectria ilicicola. Agronomy 2020, 10, 887. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060887

AMA Style

Jiang C-J, Sugano S, Ochi S, Kaga A, Ishimoto M. Evaluation of Glycine max and Glycine soja for Resistance to Calonectria ilicicola. Agronomy. 2020; 10(6):887. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060887

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiang, Chang-Jie, Shoji Sugano, Sunao Ochi, Akito Kaga, and Masao Ishimoto. 2020. "Evaluation of Glycine max and Glycine soja for Resistance to Calonectria ilicicola" Agronomy 10, no. 6: 887. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060887

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