Next Article in Journal
Managing Phosphorus Loss from Agroecosystems of the Midwestern United States: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Comparison of Frequentist and Bayesian Meta-Analysis Models for Assessing the Efficacy of Decision Support Systems in Reducing Fungal Disease Incidence
Open AccessArticle

Five-Year Field Trial of Eight Camelina sativa Cultivars for Biomass to be Used in Biofuel under Irrigated Conditions in a Semi-Arid Climate

1
MS330/Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, MS 330, 1664 N. Virginia St., University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0330, USA
2
Department of Agriculture, Veterinary & Rangeland Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89557, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040562
Received: 16 March 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 13 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Water Use and Irrigation)
Camelina sativa is a promising oilseed crop used for dietary oil and as a biofuel feedstock. C. sativa is a highly adaptable, cool season crop that can be grown on marginal lands with minimal inputs, making it potentially suitable for growth in Northern Nevada and other cooler and drier semi-arid regions of North America. A five-year (2011 to 2015) field trial was conducted to evaluate the seed yield, oil content, and oil and biodiesel production potential of eight C. sativa cultivars in semi-arid regions of Northern Nevada. Columbia, Cheyenne, Calena, and Blaine Creek were ranked as the top four varieties based on the five-year study of mean seed yield, oil content, and estimated oil and biodiesel production values, although none of the cultivars were significant (p > 0.05). Overall, Columbia displayed the highest seed yield, harvest index, oil yield and potential biodiesel production of 910 kg ha−1, 0.147, 273.4 kg ha−1, and 86.4 L ha−1, respectively, across five growing seasons. For each individual year across the eight cultivars, seed yield, oil content, oil and potential biodiesel production was highest in 2015, and lowest in 2012 and 2013 (the drier years). The seed yields of this study fall within the ranges of yields reported in both the irrigated and rainfed locations of the Western United States. Based on the seed yield, oil, and the estimated oil and biodiesel productivity reported in this study, C. sativa can be grown successfully with supplemental irrigation in semi-arid environments like Nevada. View Full-Text
Keywords: Camelina sativa; irrigated agriculture; oilseed crop; biodiesel feedstock Camelina sativa; irrigated agriculture; oilseed crop; biodiesel feedstock
MDPI and ACS Style

Lohaus, R.H.; Neupane, D.; Mengistu, M.A.; Solomon, J.K.; Cushman, J.C. Five-Year Field Trial of Eight Camelina sativa Cultivars for Biomass to be Used in Biofuel under Irrigated Conditions in a Semi-Arid Climate. Agronomy 2020, 10, 562.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop