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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Digestate on Soil Organic Carbon and Plant-Available Nutrient Content Compared to Cattle Slurry and Mineral Fertilization

1
Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Environmental Biogeochemistry, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71F, 60-625 Poznan, Poland
2
Department of Nutrition Management, Crop Research Institute, Drnovská 507, CZ-161 01 Prague 6, Ruzyně, Czechia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030379
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 26 February 2020 / Accepted: 4 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
Digestate contains many valuable nutrients, including nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K); however, it is characterized by relatively little organic matter. The objective of this study was to assess the four-year impact of digestate (Dig) application, digestate + straw (Dig + St), cattle slurry (Csl), and mineral fertilization (NPK) on soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), mineral N (Nmin), and the content of plant-available P and K. Fertilization did not have any significant influence on SOC, TN, and SOC/TN parameters. Yet, in comparison with control, there was an upward trend in the concentration of SOC and TN in the topsoil, where fertilizers were applied. In contrast to SOC and TN, fertilizer treatment significantly affected the content of P, K, and Nmin, and the differences depended on the soil depth and the fertilizer used. On average, the highest content of P was obtained in Csl treatment, but the highest content of K was observed in Dig + St. The effect of treatment on Nmin in spring was as follows: NPK = control < Csl = Dig + St < Dig. Straw plowing increased the bio-immobilization of N with digestate and, at the same time, lowered the content level of nitrates in soil. View Full-Text
Keywords: biogas slurry; magnesium; mineral nitrogen; priming effect; straw incorporation biogas slurry; magnesium; mineral nitrogen; priming effect; straw incorporation
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Barłóg, P.; Hlisnikovský, L.; Kunzová, E. Effect of Digestate on Soil Organic Carbon and Plant-Available Nutrient Content Compared to Cattle Slurry and Mineral Fertilization. Agronomy 2020, 10, 379.

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