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Article

Adaptation to Early-Season Soil Waterlogging Using Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Practices and Corn Hybrids

1
National Center for Alluvial Aquifer Research, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA
2
Division of Plant Science, University of Missouri, Novelty, MO 63460, USA
3
School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030378
Received: 22 January 2020 / Revised: 1 March 2020 / Accepted: 4 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
Excessive rainfall occurring in the early spring season in the Midwestern United States result in waterlogged soils contributing to corn production losses. The objective of our study is to evaluate the impact of soil waterlogging [non-waterlogged or waterlogged for 7 days when corn was at V3 growth stage (corn plant having three fully developed leaves with collar visible)], different pre-plant nitrogen (N) fertilizer sources and post-waterlogging rescue N fertilizer on grain and silage yield of two commercially available corn hybrids with different flood tolerance. Pre-plant N fertilizer was applied at 168 kg N ha−1. Nitrogen sources were a non-treated control (CO), polymer coated urea (PCU), urea (NCU), and urea plus Instinct (NCU + NI). A post-waterlogging rescue N fertilizer was applied at V7 as 0 or 83 kg N ha−1 of urea plus N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) (NCU + UI). Waterlogging decreased grain and silage yields in different years; however, significant interactions were observed among treatments. Rescue N applications increased grain yields by 6–46% in non-waterlogged treatments, but not in waterlogged treatments. The PCU and NCU + NI increased grain yields compared to the CO. Pre-plant N sources showed no significant differences in grain yield, probably due to existing environmental conditions or incorporation of fertilizer. The N source, application method, and timing for post-waterlogging rescue N application and flood-tolerant corn hybrids needs further investigation in poorly-drained claypan soils prone to waterlogging under a changing climate. View Full-Text
Keywords: enhanced efficiency N fertilizer; silage enhanced efficiency N fertilizer; silage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kaur, G.; Nelson, K.A.; Motavalli, P.P.; Singh, G. Adaptation to Early-Season Soil Waterlogging Using Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Practices and Corn Hybrids. Agronomy 2020, 10, 378. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030378

AMA Style

Kaur G, Nelson KA, Motavalli PP, Singh G. Adaptation to Early-Season Soil Waterlogging Using Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Practices and Corn Hybrids. Agronomy. 2020; 10(3):378. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030378

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaur, Gurpreet, Kelly A. Nelson, Peter P. Motavalli, and Gurbir Singh. 2020. "Adaptation to Early-Season Soil Waterlogging Using Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Practices and Corn Hybrids" Agronomy 10, no. 3: 378. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030378

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