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Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.) Interference, Control and Recovery under Different Management Practices and its Effects on the Grain Yield and Quality of Maize Crop

Department of Agriculture Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, 38446 Volos, Greece
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Agronomy 2020, 10(2), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10020266
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 6 February 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 13 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Weed Management & New Approaches)
Maize is an important crop grown on significant acreage around the world, and a major constraint for its growth is weed interference. Thus, field studies were conducted to examine johnsongrass interference, control, and recovery under different management practices and its effects on maize. Our results indicated that the most johnsongrass aboveground biomass was recorded in the nontreated and weed-infested for 55 days after sowing (DAS) treatments, while the lowest values were in nicosulfuron treatments (48 and 60 g a.i./ha). Among the various herbicide treatments, the greatest johnsongrass aboveground biomass was recorded in the isoxaflutole (applied pre-emergence at 99 g a.i./ha) + 1 hoeing treatment. Johnsongrass aboveground biomass at 78–85 DAS was 1.4- to 6.0-fold greater than that at 55 DAS, revealing johnsongrass recovery after nicosulfuron treatments. Johnsongrass competition had a significant impact on maize growth and grain yield. The main crop parameters, such as aboveground biomass, grain yield, and protein content, were lowest in the nontreated and weed-infested for 55 DAS treatments, while the greatest values of these parameters were recorded in the weed-free and nicosulfuron treatments. In conclusion, our results indicated that timely and effective chemical control of johnsongrass is essential for improving grain yield and quality of maize. View Full-Text
Keywords: competition; isoxaflutole; nicosulfuron; perennial weed; protein content competition; isoxaflutole; nicosulfuron; perennial weed; protein content
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Karkanis, A.; Athanasiadou, D.; Giannoulis, K.; Karanasou, K.; Zografos, S.; Souipas, S.; Bartzialis, D.; Danalatos, N. Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.) Interference, Control and Recovery under Different Management Practices and its Effects on the Grain Yield and Quality of Maize Crop. Agronomy 2020, 10, 266.

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