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Review

Photo-Crosslinked Silk Fibroin for 3D Printing

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
2
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
Polymers 2020, 12(12), 2936; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122936
Received: 19 November 2020 / Revised: 4 December 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published: 9 December 2020
Silk fibroin in material formats provides robust mechanical properties, and thus is a promising protein for 3D printing inks for a range of applications, including tissue engineering, bioelectronics, and bio-optics. Among the various crosslinking mechanisms, photo-crosslinking is particularly useful for 3D printing with silk fibroin inks due to the rapid kinetics, tunable crosslinking dynamics, light-assisted shape control, and the option to use visible light as a biocompatible processing condition. Multiple photo-crosslinking approaches have been applied to native or chemically modified silk fibroin, including photo-oxidation and free radical methacrylate polymerization. The molecular characteristics of silk fibroin, i.e., conformational polymorphism, provide a unique method for crosslinking and microfabrication via light. The molecular design features of silk fibroin inks and the exploitation of photo-crosslinking mechanisms suggest the exciting potential for meeting many biomedical needs in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: proteins; silk; additive manufacturing; photo-initiators; tyrosine; free radicals proteins; silk; additive manufacturing; photo-initiators; tyrosine; free radicals
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mu, X.; Sahoo, J.K.; Cebe, P.; Kaplan, D.L. Photo-Crosslinked Silk Fibroin for 3D Printing. Polymers 2020, 12, 2936. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122936

AMA Style

Mu X, Sahoo JK, Cebe P, Kaplan DL. Photo-Crosslinked Silk Fibroin for 3D Printing. Polymers. 2020; 12(12):2936. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122936

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mu, Xuan, Jugal K. Sahoo, Peggy Cebe, and David L. Kaplan 2020. "Photo-Crosslinked Silk Fibroin for 3D Printing" Polymers 12, no. 12: 2936. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122936

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