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Article

One Step Further in the Characterization of Synthetic Polymers by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry: Evaluating the Contribution of End-groups

1
Organic Synthesis and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Interdisciplinary Center for Mass Spectrometry (CISMa), University of Mons, UMONS, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgium
2
Laboratory for Chemistry of Novel Materials, Center of Innovation and Research in Materials and Polymers (CIRMAP), University of Mons, UMONS, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgium
3
Laboratory of Polymeric and Composite Materials, Center of Innovation and Research in Materials and Polymers (CIRMAP), University of Mons, UMONS, 23 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2019, 11(4), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040688
Received: 19 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Mass Spectrometry)
Several families of polymers possessing various end-groups are characterized by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS). A significant contribution of the end-groups to the ion collision cross section (CCS) is observed, although their role is neglected in current fitting models described in literature. Comparing polymers prepared from different synthetic procedures might thus, be misleading with the current theoretical treatments. We show that this issue is alleviated by comparing the CCS of various polymer ions (polyesters and polyethers) as a function of the number of atoms in the macroion instead of the usual representation involving the degree of polymerization. Finally, we extract the atom number density from the spectra which gives us the possibility to evaluate the compaction of polymer ions, and by extension to discern isomeric polymers. View Full-Text
Keywords: mass spectrometry; ion mobility; polymers; data fitting; ion structure mass spectrometry; ion mobility; polymers; data fitting; ion structure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Duez, Q.; Liénard, R.; Moins, S.; Lemaur, V.; Coulembier, O.; Cornil, J.; Gerbaux, P.; De Winter, J. One Step Further in the Characterization of Synthetic Polymers by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry: Evaluating the Contribution of End-groups. Polymers 2019, 11, 688. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040688

AMA Style

Duez Q, Liénard R, Moins S, Lemaur V, Coulembier O, Cornil J, Gerbaux P, De Winter J. One Step Further in the Characterization of Synthetic Polymers by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry: Evaluating the Contribution of End-groups. Polymers. 2019; 11(4):688. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040688

Chicago/Turabian Style

Duez, Quentin, Romain Liénard, Sébastien Moins, Vincent Lemaur, Olivier Coulembier, Jérôme Cornil, Pascal Gerbaux, and Julien De Winter. 2019. "One Step Further in the Characterization of Synthetic Polymers by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry: Evaluating the Contribution of End-groups" Polymers 11, no. 4: 688. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040688

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