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Open AccessArticle

Two- and Three-Dimensional Superconducting Phases in the Weyl Semimetal TaP at Ambient Pressure

1
High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML-EMFL), Radboud University, Toernooiveld 7, 6525 ED Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2
Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, D-01187 Dresden, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Laboratory of Quantum Materials (QMAT), Institute of Materials (IMX), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
Current address: Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @NEST-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa, Italy.
Crystals 2020, 10(4), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040288
Received: 5 March 2020 / Revised: 1 April 2020 / Accepted: 4 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Characterization of New Superconductors Materials)
The motivation to search for signatures of superconductivity in Weyl semi-metals and other topological phases lies in their potential for hosting exotic phenomena such as nonzero-momentum pairing or the Majorana fermion, a viable candidate for the ultimate realization of a scalable quantum computer. Until now, however, all known reports of superconductivity in type-I Weyl semi-metals have arisen through surface contact with a sharp tip, focused ion-beam surface treatment or the application of high pressures. Here, we demonstrate the observation of superconductivity in single crystals, even an as-grown crystal, of the Weyl semi-metal tantalum phosphide (TaP), at ambient pressure. A superconducting transition temperature, T c , varying between 1.7 and 5.3 K, is observed in different samples, both as-grown and microscopic samples processed with focused ion beam (FIB) etching. Our data show that the superconductivity present in the as-grown crystal is inhomogeneous yet three-dimensional. For samples fabricated with FIB, we observe, in addition to the three-dimensional superconductivity, a second superconducting phase that resides on the sample surface. Through measurements of the characteristic fields as a function of temperature and angle, we are able to confirm the dimensionality of the two distinct superconducting phases. View Full-Text
Keywords: superconductivity; Weyl semimetal; focused ion beam superconductivity; Weyl semimetal; focused ion beam
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MDPI and ACS Style

van Delft, M.R.; Pezzini, S.; König, M.; Tinnemans, P.; Hussey, N.E.; Wiedmann, S. Two- and Three-Dimensional Superconducting Phases in the Weyl Semimetal TaP at Ambient Pressure. Crystals 2020, 10, 288. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040288

AMA Style

van Delft MR, Pezzini S, König M, Tinnemans P, Hussey NE, Wiedmann S. Two- and Three-Dimensional Superconducting Phases in the Weyl Semimetal TaP at Ambient Pressure. Crystals. 2020; 10(4):288. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040288

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Delft, Maarten R.; Pezzini, Sergio; König, Markus; Tinnemans, Paul; Hussey, Nigel E.; Wiedmann, Steffen. 2020. "Two- and Three-Dimensional Superconducting Phases in the Weyl Semimetal TaP at Ambient Pressure" Crystals 10, no. 4: 288. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040288

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