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Games 2018, 9(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/g9040077

Social Distance Matters in Dictator Games: Evidence from 11 Mexican Villages

1
Department of Economics, CUNY Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd, New York, NY 11367, USA
2
Department of Economics, Texas A&M University, 4228 TAMU, College Station, TX 77845, USA
3
Department of Philosophy, The University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210027, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 September 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dictator Games)
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Abstract

We examine the impact of social distance in dictator game giving. The study is conducted in a field setting with high stakes (two days’ wages). The sample is a representative sample from eleven low-income Mexican villages. Subjects make multiple dictator decisions simultaneously, in a comparative dictator game. We show the relationship between social distance and giving using several family members, a member of the same village, and a stranger from a different village. Dictator giving shows substantial variation across recipient types and varies directly with social distance. We find higher giving towards family members than towards community members and strangers. Furthermore, our results indicate that giving to community members and to strangers is not different. In light of our results, it is important to consider the impact of social distance on inter- and intra-household transfers in policy interventions that alleviate poverty, e.g., conditional transfers. View Full-Text
Keywords: charitable giving; social distance; development; lab-in-field experiment; comparative dictator game charitable giving; social distance; development; lab-in-field experiment; comparative dictator game
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Candelo, N.; Eckel, C.; Johnson, C. Social Distance Matters in Dictator Games: Evidence from 11 Mexican Villages. Games 2018, 9, 77.

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