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Review

Skin Cancers and the Contribution of Rho GTPase Signaling Networks to Their Progression

1
Oncology Division, CHU de Québec–Université Laval Research Center, Québec City, QC G1V 4G2, Canada
2
Université Laval Cancer Research Center, Université Laval, Québec City, QC G1R 3S3, Canada
3
Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec City, QC G1V OA6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
Academic Editor: Paulo Matos
Cancers 2021, 13(17), 4362; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174362
Received: 23 July 2021 / Revised: 20 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 28 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Small GTPase Signaling in Tumorigenesis)
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in human. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most prevalent skin cancer subtypes. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the progression of skin cancer is essential due to their prevalence in the population and the emergence of resistance to current treatment for aggressive cases. The aim of our review is to provide an overview of how Rho GTPases and their regulators contribute to skin cancer progression via the perturbation of their function in the skin.
Skin cancers are the most common cancers worldwide. Among them, melanoma, basal cell carcinoma of the skin and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma are the three major subtypes. These cancers are characterized by different genetic perturbations even though they are similarly caused by a lifelong exposure to the sun. The main oncogenic drivers of skin cancer initiation have been known for a while, yet it remains unclear what are the molecular events that mediate their oncogenic functions and that contribute to their progression. Moreover, patients with aggressive skin cancers have been known to develop resistance to currently available treatment, which is urging us to identify new therapeutic opportunities based on a better understanding of skin cancer biology. More recently, the contribution of cytoskeletal dynamics and Rho GTPase signaling networks to the progression of skin cancers has been highlighted by several studies. In this review, we underline the various perturbations in the activity and regulation of Rho GTPase network components that contribute to skin cancer development, and we explore the emerging therapeutic opportunities that are surfacing from these studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rho GTPase; RhoGEF; RhoGAP; skin; cancer; squamous cell carcinoma; basal cell carcinoma; melanoma Rho GTPase; RhoGEF; RhoGAP; skin; cancer; squamous cell carcinoma; basal cell carcinoma; melanoma
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pecora, A.; Laprise, J.; Dahmene, M.; Laurin, M. Skin Cancers and the Contribution of Rho GTPase Signaling Networks to Their Progression. Cancers 2021, 13, 4362. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174362

AMA Style

Pecora A, Laprise J, Dahmene M, Laurin M. Skin Cancers and the Contribution of Rho GTPase Signaling Networks to Their Progression. Cancers. 2021; 13(17):4362. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174362

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pecora, Alessandra, Justine Laprise, Manel Dahmene, and Mélanie Laurin. 2021. "Skin Cancers and the Contribution of Rho GTPase Signaling Networks to Their Progression" Cancers 13, no. 17: 4362. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174362

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