Next Article in Journal
Multi-Habitat Radiomics Unravels Distinct Phenotypic Subtypes of Glioblastoma with Clinical and Genomic Significance
Next Article in Special Issue
Reactive Oxygen Species and Antitumor Immunity—From Surveillance to Evasion
Previous Article in Journal
Potential of Tyrosine Kinase Receptor TIE-1 as Novel Therapeutic Target in High-PI3K-Expressing Ovarian Cancer
Previous Article in Special Issue
Glucose Metabolism and Oxidative Stress in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Role and Possible Implications in Novel Therapeutic Strategies
Open AccessReview

Targeting the Redox Landscape in Cancer Therapy

by Dilip Narayanan 1,†, Sana Ma 1,† and Dennis Özcelik 1,2,*
1
Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2
current address: Chemistry | Biology | Pharmacy Information Center, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 10, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cancers 2020, 12(7), 1706; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071706
Received: 31 May 2020 / Revised: 22 June 2020 / Accepted: 25 June 2020 / Published: 27 June 2020
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced predominantly by the mitochondrial electron transport chain and by NADPH oxidases in peroxisomes and in the endoplasmic reticulum. The antioxidative defense counters overproduction of ROS with detoxifying enzymes and molecular scavengers, for instance, superoxide dismutase and glutathione, in order to restore redox homeostasis. Mutations in the redox landscape can induce carcinogenesis, whereas increased ROS production can perpetuate cancer development. Moreover, cancer cells can increase production of antioxidants, leading to resistance against chemo- or radiotherapy. Research has been developing pharmaceuticals to target the redox landscape in cancer. For instance, inhibition of key players in the redox landscape aims to modulate ROS production in order to prevent tumor development or to sensitize cancer cells in radiotherapy. Besides the redox landscape of a single cell, alternative strategies take aim at the multi-cellular level. Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are crucial for the development of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, and hence are explored as target and as drug delivery systems in cancer therapy. This review summarizes the current pharmaceutical and experimental interventions of the cancer redox landscape. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress response; reactive oxygen species; Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway; antioxidants; redox homeostasis; exosomes; extracellular vesicles; tumor redox microenvironment; hypoxia; drug development oxidative stress response; reactive oxygen species; Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway; antioxidants; redox homeostasis; exosomes; extracellular vesicles; tumor redox microenvironment; hypoxia; drug development
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Narayanan, D.; Ma, S.; Özcelik, D. Targeting the Redox Landscape in Cancer Therapy. Cancers 2020, 12, 1706.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop