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Review

Tissue-Resident NK Cells: Development, Maturation, and Clinical Relevance

1
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Immunotherapy, Blood Research Institute, Versiti, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA
3
Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061553
Received: 8 May 2020 / Revised: 8 June 2020 / Accepted: 8 June 2020 / Published: 12 June 2020
Natural killer (NK) cells belong to type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and are essential in killing infected or transformed cells. NK cells mediate their effector functions using non-clonotypic germ-line-encoded activation receptors. The utilization of non-polymorphic and conserved activating receptors promoted the conceptual dogma that NK cells are homogeneous with limited but focused immune functions. However, emerging studies reveal that NK cells are highly heterogeneous with divergent immune functions. A distinct combination of several activation and inhibitory receptors form a diverse array of NK cell subsets in both humans and mice. Importantly, one of the central factors that determine NK cell heterogeneity and their divergent functions is their tissue residency. Decades of studies provided strong support that NK cells develop in the bone marrow. However, evolving evidence supports the notion that NK cells also develop and differentiate in tissues. Here, we summarize the molecular basis, phenotypic signatures, and functions of tissue-resident NK cells and compare them with conventional NK cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: NK cells; tissue-resident; anti-cancer responses NK cells; tissue-resident; anti-cancer responses
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hashemi, E.; Malarkannan, S. Tissue-Resident NK Cells: Development, Maturation, and Clinical Relevance. Cancers 2020, 12, 1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061553

AMA Style

Hashemi E, Malarkannan S. Tissue-Resident NK Cells: Development, Maturation, and Clinical Relevance. Cancers. 2020; 12(6):1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061553

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hashemi, Elaheh, and Subramaniam Malarkannan. 2020. "Tissue-Resident NK Cells: Development, Maturation, and Clinical Relevance" Cancers 12, no. 6: 1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061553

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