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Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

1
Gastroenterology Unit, San Carlo Hospital, Via P. Petrone, 85100 Potenza, Italy
2
Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Viale Camillo Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia, Italy
3
Clinical Research, Pancreato-Biliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milano, Italy
4
Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute “Giovanni Paolo II”, Viale O. Flacco 65, 70124 Bari, Italy
5
Residency Program in Medical Oncology, University of Verona, Via S. Francesco 22, 37129 Verona, Italy
6
AOUI Verona, Sede Policlinico Universitario G.B. Rossi Borgo Roma, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy
7
Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(2), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020275
Received: 16 December 2019 / Revised: 14 January 2020 / Accepted: 20 January 2020 / Published: 22 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pancreatic Cancer Research)
Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and the seventh leading cause of global cancer deaths in industrialised countries. More than 80% of patients suffer from significant weight loss at diagnosis and over time tend to develop severe cachexia. A major cause of weight loss is malnutrition. Patients may experience pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) before diagnosis, during nonsurgical treatment, and/or following surgery. PEI is difficult to diagnose because testing is cumbersome. Consequently, PEI is often detected clinically, especially in non-specialised centres, and treated empirically. In this position paper, we review the current literature on nutritional support and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in patients with operable and non-operable pancreatic cancer. To increase awareness on the importance of PERT in pancreatic patients, we provide recommendations based on literature evidence, and when data were lacking, based on our own clinical experience. View Full-Text
Keywords: pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy; pancreatic exocrine insufficiency; pancreatic cancer; chemotherapy; pancreatic resection; nutritional support pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy; pancreatic exocrine insufficiency; pancreatic cancer; chemotherapy; pancreatic resection; nutritional support
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pezzilli, R.; Caccialanza, R.; Capurso, G.; Brunetti, O.; Milella, M.; Falconi, M. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer. Cancers 2020, 12, 275.

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