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Open AccessTechnical Note

Characterization of 3D-Printed Moulds for Soft Lithography of Millifluidic Devices

1
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
2
Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
3
Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2018, 9(3), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9030116
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 28 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printed Microfluidic Devices)
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Abstract

Increased demand for inexpensive and rapid prototyping methods for micro- and millifluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices has stimulated considerable interest in alternative cost-effective fabrication techniques. Additive manufacturing (AM)—also called three-dimensional (3D) printing—provides an attractive alternative to conventional fabrication techniques. AM has been used to produce LOC master moulds from which positive replicas are made using soft-lithography and a biocompatible elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Here we characterize moulds made using two AM methods—stereolithography (SLA) and material-jetting (MJ)—and the positive replicas produced by soft lithography and PDMS moulding. The results showed that SLA, more than MJ, produced finer part resolution and finer tuning of feature geometry. Furthermore, as assessed by zebrafish (Danio rerio) biotoxicity tests, there was no toxicity observed in SLA and MJ moulded PDMS replicas. We conclude that SLA, utilizing commercially available printers and resins, combined with PDMS soft-lithography, is a simple and easily accessible technique that lends its self particularly well to the fabrication of biocompatible millifluidic devices, highly suited to the in-situ analysis of small model organisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: stereolithography; material jetting; soft lithography; Lab-on-a-Chip; millifluidic; biodevices; biotests; polydimethylsiloxane stereolithography; material jetting; soft lithography; Lab-on-a-Chip; millifluidic; biodevices; biotests; polydimethylsiloxane
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Mohd Fuad, N.; Carve, M.; Kaslin, J.; Wlodkowic, D. Characterization of 3D-Printed Moulds for Soft Lithography of Millifluidic Devices. Micromachines 2018, 9, 116.

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