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Development of Microfluidic Stretch System for Studying Recovery of Damaged Skeletal Muscle Cells

1,†, 1,†, 1,* and 1,2,*
1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea
2
KI HST, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contribute equally to the current work.
Micromachines 2018, 9(12), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9120671
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 9 December 2018 / Accepted: 16 December 2018 / Published: 18 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Cell Assay Chips)
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PDF [1674 KB, uploaded 21 December 2018]
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Abstract

The skeletal muscle occupies about 40% mass of the human body and plays a significant role in the skeletal movement control. Skeletal muscle injury also occurs often and causes pain, discomfort, and functional impairment in daily living. Clinically, most studies observed the recovery phenomenon of muscle by massage or electrical stimulation, but there are limitations on quantitatively analyzing the effects on recovery. Although additional efforts have been made within in vitro biochemical research, some questions still remain for effects of the different cell microenvironment for recovery. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a microfluidic system to investigate appropriate conditions for repairing skeletal muscle injury. First, the muscle cells were cultured in the microfluidic chip and differentiated to muscle fibers. After differentiation, we treated hydrogen peroxide and 18% axial stretch to cause chemical and physical damage to the muscle fibers. Then the damaged muscle fibers were placed under the cyclic stretch condition to allow recovery. Finally, we analyzed the damage and recovery by quantifying morphological change as well as the intensity change of intracellular fluorescent signals and showed the skeletal muscle fibers recovered better in the cyclic stretched condition. In total, our in situ generation of muscle damage and induction recovery platform may be a key system for investigating muscle recovery and rehabilitation. View Full-Text
Keywords: skeletal muscle cells; muscle damage; recovery model; mechanical stretch; microfluidics skeletal muscle cells; muscle damage; recovery model; mechanical stretch; microfluidics
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Kim, W.; Kim, J.; Park, H.-S.; Jeon, J.S. Development of Microfluidic Stretch System for Studying Recovery of Damaged Skeletal Muscle Cells. Micromachines 2018, 9, 671.

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