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Communication

Design Choices for Next-Generation Neurotechnology Can Impact Motion Artifact in Electrophysiological and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Measurements

1
Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
4
Division of Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
5
Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
6
Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
7
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
8
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
9
NeuroTech Center of the University of Pittsburgh Brain Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
10
Center for Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
11
Department of Bioengineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
12
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Micromachines 2018, 9(10), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9100494
Received: 15 August 2018 / Revised: 15 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Microelectrodes: Design and Applications)
Implantable devices to measure neurochemical or electrical activity from the brain are mainstays of neuroscience research and have become increasingly utilized as enabling components of clinical therapies. In order to increase the number of recording channels on these devices while minimizing the immune response, flexible electrodes under 10 µm in diameter have been proposed as ideal next-generation neural interfaces. However, the representation of motion artifact during neurochemical or electrophysiological recordings using ultra-small, flexible electrodes remains unexplored. In this short communication, we characterize motion artifact generated by the movement of 7 µm diameter carbon fiber electrodes during electrophysiological recordings and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) measurements of electroactive neurochemicals. Through in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that artifact induced by motion can be problematic to distinguish from the characteristic signals associated with recorded action potentials or neurochemical measurements. These results underscore that new electrode materials and recording paradigms can alter the representation of common sources of artifact in vivo and therefore must be carefully characterized. View Full-Text
Keywords: electrode; artifact; electrophysiology; electrochemistry; fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV); neurotechnology; neural interface; neuromodulation; neuroprosthetics; brain-machine interfaces electrode; artifact; electrophysiology; electrochemistry; fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV); neurotechnology; neural interface; neuromodulation; neuroprosthetics; brain-machine interfaces
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nicolai, E.N.; Michelson, N.J.; Settell, M.L.; Hara, S.A.; Trevathan, J.K.; Asp, A.J.; Stocking, K.C.; Lujan, J.L.; Kozai, T.D.Y.; Ludwig, K.A. Design Choices for Next-Generation Neurotechnology Can Impact Motion Artifact in Electrophysiological and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Measurements. Micromachines 2018, 9, 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9100494

AMA Style

Nicolai EN, Michelson NJ, Settell ML, Hara SA, Trevathan JK, Asp AJ, Stocking KC, Lujan JL, Kozai TDY, Ludwig KA. Design Choices for Next-Generation Neurotechnology Can Impact Motion Artifact in Electrophysiological and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Measurements. Micromachines. 2018; 9(10):494. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9100494

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nicolai, Evan N., Nicholas J. Michelson, Megan L. Settell, Seth A. Hara, James K. Trevathan, Anders J. Asp, Kaylene C. Stocking, J. L. Lujan, Takashi D.Y. Kozai, and Kip A. Ludwig 2018. "Design Choices for Next-Generation Neurotechnology Can Impact Motion Artifact in Electrophysiological and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Measurements" Micromachines 9, no. 10: 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9100494

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