Next Article in Journal
Comparative Evaluation of Artificial Neural Networks and Data Analysis in Predicting Liposome Size in a Periodic Disturbance Micromixer
Next Article in Special Issue
Margination of Platelet-Sized Particles in the Red Blood Cell Suspension Flow through Square Microchannels
Previous Article in Journal
A Study on TiO2 Surface Texturing Effect for the Enhancement of Photocatalytic Reaction in a Total Phosphorous Concentration Measurement System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fabrication of Microparticles with Front–Back Asymmetric Shapes Using Anisotropic Gelation
Article

Axial and Nonaxial Migration of Red Blood Cells in a Microtube

1
Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-8531, Japan
2
Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita 564-8680, Japan
3
Department of Finemechanics, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba, Sendai 980-8579, Japan
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, 5 Senju-Asahi, Adachi, Tokyo 120-8551, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aiqun Liu
Micromachines 2021, 12(10), 1162; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12101162
Received: 2 September 2021 / Revised: 22 September 2021 / Accepted: 24 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
Human red blood cells (RBCs) are subjected to high viscous shear stress, especially during microcirculation, resulting in stable deformed shapes such as parachute or slipper shape. Those unique deformed RBC shapes, accompanied with axial or nonaxial migration, cannot be fully described according to traditional knowledge about lateral movement of deformable spherical particles. Although several experimental and numerical studies have investigated RBC behavior in microchannels with similar diameters as RBCs, the detailed mechanical characteristics of RBC lateral movement—in particular, regarding the relationship between stable deformed shapes, equilibrium radial RBC position, and membrane load—has not yet been fully described. Thus, we numerically investigated the behavior of single RBCs with radii of 4 μm in a circular microchannel with diameters of 15 μm. Flow was assumed to be almost inertialess. The problem was characterized by the capillary number, which is the ratio between fluid viscous force and membrane elastic force. The power (or energy dissipation) associated with membrane deformations was introduced to quantify the state of membrane loads. Simulations were performed with different capillary numbers, viscosity ratios of the internal to external fluids of RBCs, and initial RBC centroid positions. Our numerical results demonstrated that axial or nonaxial migration of RBC depended on the stable deformed RBC shapes, and the equilibrium radial position of the RBC centroid correlated well with energy expenditure associated with membrane deformations. View Full-Text
Keywords: red blood cells; axial migration; lattice-Boltzmann method; finite element method; immersed boundary method; computational biomechanics red blood cells; axial migration; lattice-Boltzmann method; finite element method; immersed boundary method; computational biomechanics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Takeishi, N.; Yamashita, H.; Omori, T.; Yokoyama, N.; Sugihara-Seki, M. Axial and Nonaxial Migration of Red Blood Cells in a Microtube. Micromachines 2021, 12, 1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12101162

AMA Style

Takeishi N, Yamashita H, Omori T, Yokoyama N, Sugihara-Seki M. Axial and Nonaxial Migration of Red Blood Cells in a Microtube. Micromachines. 2021; 12(10):1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12101162

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takeishi, Naoki, Hiroshi Yamashita, Toshihiro Omori, Naoto Yokoyama, and Masako Sugihara-Seki. 2021. "Axial and Nonaxial Migration of Red Blood Cells in a Microtube" Micromachines 12, no. 10: 1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12101162

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop