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Application of an In Vitro Digestion Model for Wheat and Red Beetroot Bread to Assess the Bioaccessibility of Aflatoxin B1, Ochratoxin A and Zearalenone and Betalains
 
 
Article

Toxigenicity of F. graminearum Residing on Host Plants Alternative to Wheat as Influenced by Environmental Conditions

1
Institute of Agriculture, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, LT-58344 Akademija, Lithuania
2
Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”, Lejupes Iela 3, LV-1076 Riga, Latvia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2022, 14(8), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080541
Received: 15 July 2022 / Revised: 5 August 2022 / Accepted: 5 August 2022 / Published: 8 August 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Mycotoxins)
Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) in several cereal crops worldwide. The potential of this pathogen to contaminate cereals with trichothecene mycotoxins presents a health risk for both humans and animals. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of different trichothecene genotypes of F. graminearum isolated from an alternative host plant to produce mycotoxins under different spring wheat grain incubation conditions. Fourteen F. graminearum strains were isolated from seven alternative host plants and identified as 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3-ADON) and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15-ADON) genotypes. These strains were cultivated on spring wheat grains at 25 °C and 29 °C for 5 weeks. The mycotoxins produced were analysed with a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) coupled to a Thermo Scientific TSQ Quantiva MS/MS detector. The obtained results showed that the F. graminearum strains from alternative host plants could produce nivalenol (NIV), deoxynivalenol (DON), fusarenon-X (FUS-X), 3-ADON, deoxynivalenol-3-ß-d-glucoside (D3G), 15-ADON, and zearalenone (ZEA). F. graminearum strains produced DON and ZEA under both temperatures, with the mean concentrations varying from 363 to 112,379 µg kg−1 and from 1452 to 44,816 µg kg−1, respectively. Our results indicated the possible role of dicotyledonous plants, including weeds, as a reservoir of inoculum sources of F. graminearum-induced Fusarium head blight, associated with the risk of mycotoxin contamination in spring wheat. View Full-Text
Keywords: alternative host; Fusarium graminearum; mycotoxin profile; environmental conditions alternative host; Fusarium graminearum; mycotoxin profile; environmental conditions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Janaviciene, S.; Suproniene, S.; Kadziene, G.; Pavlenko, R.; Berzina, Z.; Bartkevics, V. Toxigenicity of F. graminearum Residing on Host Plants Alternative to Wheat as Influenced by Environmental Conditions. Toxins 2022, 14, 541. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080541

AMA Style

Janaviciene S, Suproniene S, Kadziene G, Pavlenko R, Berzina Z, Bartkevics V. Toxigenicity of F. graminearum Residing on Host Plants Alternative to Wheat as Influenced by Environmental Conditions. Toxins. 2022; 14(8):541. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080541

Chicago/Turabian Style

Janaviciene, Sigita, Skaidre Suproniene, Grazina Kadziene, Romans Pavlenko, Zane Berzina, and Vadims Bartkevics. 2022. "Toxigenicity of F. graminearum Residing on Host Plants Alternative to Wheat as Influenced by Environmental Conditions" Toxins 14, no. 8: 541. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080541

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