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Article

Growth and Toxigenicity of A. flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Peanut Genotypes

1
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute (CSIR-SARI), Nyankpala NL-1032-0471, Ghana
2
Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Consumer Sciences, University for Development Studies, Nyankpala NL-1029-6240, Ghana
3
Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi AK-448-1125, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2022, 14(8), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080536
Received: 6 June 2022 / Revised: 14 July 2022 / Accepted: 18 July 2022 / Published: 5 August 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection, Control and Contamination of Mycotoxins)
Aflatoxin contamination poses serious health concerns to consumers of peanut and peanut products. This study aimed at investigating the response of peanuts to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. Isolates of A. flavus were characterised either as aflatoxigenic or non-aflatoxigenic using multiple cultural techniques. The selected isolates were used in an in vitro seed colonisation (IVSC) experiment on two A. flavus-resistant and susceptible peanut genotypes. Disease incidence, severity, and aflatoxin accumulation were measured. Genotypes differed significantly (p < 0.001) in terms of the incidence and severity of aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus infection with the non-aflatoxigenic isolate having significantly higher incidence and severity values. There was no accumulation of aflatoxins in peanut genotypes inoculated with non-aflatoxigenic isolate, indicating its potential as a biocontrol agent. Inoculations with the aflatoxigenic isolate resulted in the accumulation of aflatoxin B1 and G1 in all the peanut genotypes. Aflatoxin B2 was not detected in ICGV–03401 (resistant genotype), while it was present and higher in Manipinta (susceptible genotype) than L027B (resistant genotype). ICGV–03401 can resist fungal infection and aflatoxin accumulation than L027B and Manipinta. Non-aflatoxigenic isolate detected in this study could further be investigated as a biocontrol agent. View Full-Text
Keywords: aflatoxigenic; in vitro seed colonisation; non-aflatoxigenic; host plant resistance and susceptible aflatoxigenic; in vitro seed colonisation; non-aflatoxigenic; host plant resistance and susceptible
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tengey, T.K.; Kankam, F.; Ndela, D.N.; Frempong, D.; Appaw, W.O. Growth and Toxigenicity of A. flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Peanut Genotypes. Toxins 2022, 14, 536. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080536

AMA Style

Tengey TK, Kankam F, Ndela DN, Frempong D, Appaw WO. Growth and Toxigenicity of A. flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Peanut Genotypes. Toxins. 2022; 14(8):536. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080536

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tengey, Theophilus Kwabla, Frederick Kankam, Dominic Ngagmayan Ndela, Daniel Frempong, and William Ofori Appaw. 2022. "Growth and Toxigenicity of A. flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Peanut Genotypes" Toxins 14, no. 8: 536. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14080536

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