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Open AccessArticle

The Potential of Peroxidases Extracted from the Spent Mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) Substrate Significantly Degrade Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol

1
Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
2
Department of Animal and Aquatic Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
3
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
4
Translational Medicine Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
5
Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, College of Information and Electrical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2021, 13(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13010072
Received: 17 November 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 16 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mycotoxins on Health and Performance in Animals)
Little is known about the degradability of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) by the spent mushroom substrate (SMS)-derived manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP) and its potential. The present study investigated the growth inhibition of Fusarium graminearum KR1 and the degradation of DON by MnP and LiP extracted from SMS. The results from the 7-day treatment period showed that mycelium inhibition of F. graminearum KR1 by MnP and LiP were 23.7% and 74.7%, respectively. Deoxynivalenol production in the mycelium of F. graminearum KR1 was undetectable after treatment with 50 U/mL of MnP or LiP for 7 days. N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) content and chitinase activity both increased in the hyphae of F. graminearum KR1 after treatment with MnP and LiP for 1, 3, and 6 h, respectively. At 12 h, only the LiP-treated group had higher chitinase activity and GlcNAc content than those of the control group (p < 0.05). However, more than 60% of DON degradabilities (0.5 mg/kg, 1 h) were observed under various pH values (2.5, 4.5, and 6.5) in both MnP (50 U/g) and LiP (50 U/g) groups, while DON degradability at 1 mg/kg was 85.5% after 50 U/g of LiP treatment for 7 h in simulated pig gastrointestinal tracts. Similarly, DON degradability at 5 mg/kg was 67.1% after LiP treatment for 4.5 h in simulated poultry gastrointestinal tracts. The present study demonstrated that SMS-extracted peroxidases, particularly LiP, could effectively degrade DON and inhibit the mycelium growth of F. graminearum KR1. View Full-Text
Keywords: deoxynivalenol; detoxification; Fusarium graminearum; lignin peroxidase; manganese peroxidase deoxynivalenol; detoxification; Fusarium graminearum; lignin peroxidase; manganese peroxidase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tso, K.-H.; Lumsangkul, C.; Ju, J.-C.; Fan, Y.-K.; Chiang, H.-I. The Potential of Peroxidases Extracted from the Spent Mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) Substrate Significantly Degrade Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol. Toxins 2021, 13, 72. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13010072

AMA Style

Tso K-H, Lumsangkul C, Ju J-C, Fan Y-K, Chiang H-I. The Potential of Peroxidases Extracted from the Spent Mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) Substrate Significantly Degrade Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol. Toxins. 2021; 13(1):72. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13010072

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tso, Ko-Hua; Lumsangkul, Chompunut; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Fan, Yang-Kwang; Chiang, Hsin-I. 2021. "The Potential of Peroxidases Extracted from the Spent Mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) Substrate Significantly Degrade Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol" Toxins 13, no. 1: 72. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13010072

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