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Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Long-Term Outcomes of Snakebite in Taiwan

by Teng-I Huang 1 and Ching-Liang Hsieh 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40447, Taiwan
2
Chinese Medicine Research Center, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3
Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2020, 12(2), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12020132
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 17 February 2020 / Accepted: 18 February 2020 / Published: 20 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long-Term Effects of Venom in Bites and Stings)
Herein, we review the characteristics of the six predominant venomous snakes in Taiwan and the effects of traditional Chinese medicine on the long-term outcomes of snakebite venom. We electronically searched databases, including PubMed, ClinicalKey, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations in Taiwan, and Airiti Library, from their inception to November 2019 by using the following Medical Subject Headings’ keywords: snakebite, long-term, chronic, Chinese medicine, CAM, herb, and Taiwan. The most common long-term effects of snakebite envenomation include “migraine-like syndrome”, brain injuries caused by hypoxia or intracranial hemorrhage, and chronic kidney disease. In addition, hypopituitarism is also worth mentioning. Traditional Chinese medicine can potentially be used in a complementary or alternative treatment for these effects, but additional studies are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: traditional Chinese medicine; long-term effects; venom; snakebites traditional Chinese medicine; long-term effects; venom; snakebites
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, T.-I.; Hsieh, C.-L. Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Long-Term Outcomes of Snakebite in Taiwan. Toxins 2020, 12, 132.

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