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Article

Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation on Composition in Mice with CKD

1
CarMeN Lab, INSA-Lyon, INSERM U1060, INRA, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69100 Villeurbanne, France
2
Department of Nephrology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon Sud Hospital, 69310 Pierre Bénite, France
3
Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70124 Bari, Italy
4
Nephrology Section, Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Ghent University Hospital, 9000 Gent, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2020, 12(12), 741; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12120741
Received: 2 October 2020 / Revised: 7 November 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota Dynamics and Uremic Toxins)
Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a renal disorder characterized by the accumulation of uremic toxins with limited strategies to reduce their concentrations. A large amount of data supports the pivotal role of intestinal microbiota in CKD complications and as a major source of uremic toxins production. Here, we explored whether fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could be attenuated in metabolic complication and uremic toxin accumulation in mice with CKD. Methods: Kidney failure was chemically induced by a diet containing 0.25% (w/w) of adenine for four weeks. Mice were randomized into three groups: control, CKD and CKD + FMT groups. After four weeks, CKD mice underwent fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy mice or phosphate buffered saline as control. The gut microbiota structure, uremic toxins plasmatic concentrations, and metabolic profiles were explored three weeks after transplantation. Results: Associated with the increase of alpha diversity, we observed a noticeable improvement of gut microbiota disturbance, after FMT treatment. FMT further decreased p-cresyl sulfate accumulation and improved glucose tolerance. There was no change in kidney function. Conclusions: These data indicate that FMT limited the accumulation of uremic toxins issued from intestinal cresol pathway by a beneficial effect on gut microbiota diversity. Further studies are needed to investigate the FMT efficiency, the timing and feces amount for the transplantation before, to become a therapeutic option in CKD patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic kidney disease; fecal microbiota transplantation; uremic toxins; p-cresyl-sulfate chronic kidney disease; fecal microbiota transplantation; uremic toxins; p-cresyl-sulfate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barba, C.; Soulage, C.O.; Caggiano, G.; Glorieux, G.; Fouque, D.; Koppe, L. Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation on Composition in Mice with CKD. Toxins 2020, 12, 741. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12120741

AMA Style

Barba C, Soulage CO, Caggiano G, Glorieux G, Fouque D, Koppe L. Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation on Composition in Mice with CKD. Toxins. 2020; 12(12):741. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12120741

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barba, Christophe, Christophe O. Soulage, Gianvito Caggiano, Griet Glorieux, Denis Fouque, and Laetitia Koppe. 2020. "Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation on Composition in Mice with CKD" Toxins 12, no. 12: 741. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12120741

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