Next Article in Journal
Alteration of Bumblebee Venom Composition toward Higher Elevation
Previous Article in Journal
Zearalenone Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Modulates the Expression of Phase I/II Enzymes in Human Liver Cells
Previous Article in Special Issue
Proteomic Characterization of High-Density Lipoprotein Particles from Non-Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients
Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of Electrolyte Concentration and Pro-Inflammatory and Oxidative Status in Dogs with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease under Dietary Treatment

1
School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva, 87, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05508-270, Brazil
2
Animal Sciences Department, College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 217-333-3131, USA
3
Nutrition Development Center, Grand Food Industria e Comercio Ltda (Premier Pet), Dourado, SP 13590-000, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 16 December 2019 / Accepted: 17 December 2019 / Published: 19 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uremia and Metabolic Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease )
An integrated study on the effect of renal diet on mineral metabolism, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), total antioxidant capacity, and inflammatory markers has not been performed previously. In this study, we evaluated the effects of renal diet on mineral metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation in dogs with stage 3 or 4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Body condition score (BCS), muscle condition score (MCS), serum biochemical profile, ionized calcium (i-Ca), total calcium (t-Ca), phosphorus (P), urea, creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH), FGF-23, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured at baseline (T0) and after 6 months of dietary treatment (T6). Serum urea, P, t-Ca, i-Ca, PTH, FGF-23, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and TAC measurements did not differ between T0 and T6. Serum creatinine (SCr) was increased at T6 and serum PTH concentrations were positively correlated with serum SCr and urea. i-Ca was negatively correlated with urea and serum phosphorus was positively correlated with FGF-23. Urea and creatinine were positively correlated. The combination of renal diet and support treatment over 6 months in dogs with CKD stage 3 or 4 was effective in controlling uremia, acid–base balance, blood pressure, total antioxidant capacity, and inflammatory cytokine levels and in maintaining BCS and MCS. View Full-Text
Keywords: secondary renal hyperparathyroidism; oxidative stress; inflammation; canine secondary renal hyperparathyroidism; oxidative stress; inflammation; canine
MDPI and ACS Style

Halfen, D.P.; Caragelasco, D.S.; Nogueira, J.P.S.; Jeremias, J.T.; Pedrinelli, V.; Oba, P.M.; Ruberti, B.; Pontieri, C.F.F.; Kogika, M.M.; Brunetto, M.A. Evaluation of Electrolyte Concentration and Pro-Inflammatory and Oxidative Status in Dogs with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease under Dietary Treatment. Toxins 2020, 12, 3.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop