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Toxins 2018, 10(11), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins10110446

Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxin Monitoring in Commercial Wild Harvest Bivalve Shellfish in New South Wales, Australia

1
NSW Food Authority, 6 Avenue of the Americas, Newington, NSW 2127, Australia
2
Climate Change Cluster (C3), University of Technology Sydney, 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
3
Microalgal Services, 308 Tucker Rd, Ormond, VIC 3204, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 30 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dinophysis Toxins: Distribution, Fate in Shellfish and Impacts)
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Abstract

An end-product market survey on biotoxins in commercial wild harvest shellfish (Plebidonax deltoides, Katelysia spp., Anadara granosa, Notocallista kingii) during three harvest seasons (2015–2017) from the coast of New South Wales, Australia found 99.38% of samples were within regulatory limits. Diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) were present in 34.27% of 321 samples but only in pipis (P. deltoides), with two samples above the regulatory limit. Comparison of these market survey data to samples (phytoplankton in water and biotoxins in shellfish tissue) collected during the same period at wild harvest beaches demonstrated that, while elevated concentrations of Dinophysis were detected, a lag in detecting bloom events on two occasions meant that wild harvest shellfish with DSTs above the regulatory limit entered the marketplace. Concurrently, data (phytoplankton and biotoxin) from Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) harvest areas in estuaries adjacent to wild harvest beaches impacted by DSTs frequently showed elevated Dinophysis concentrations, but DSTs were not detected in oyster samples. These results highlighted a need for distinct management strategies for different shellfish species, particularly during Dinophysis bloom events. DSTs above the regulatory limit in pipis sampled from the marketplace suggested there is merit in looking at options to strengthen the current wild harvest biotoxin management strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: diarrhetic shellfish toxins; Dinophysis; wild harvest; bivalve shellfish; pipis (Plebidonax deltoides); Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) diarrhetic shellfish toxins; Dinophysis; wild harvest; bivalve shellfish; pipis (Plebidonax deltoides); Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata)
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Farrell, H.; Ajani, P.; Murray, S.; Baker, P.; Webster, G.; Brett, S.; Zammit, A. Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxin Monitoring in Commercial Wild Harvest Bivalve Shellfish in New South Wales, Australia. Toxins 2018, 10, 446.

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