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Open AccessArticle

A Common Variant in the SETD7 Gene Predicts Serum Lycopene Concentrations

1
Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
2
The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA 18509, USA
3
Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
4
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2016, 8(2), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8020082
Received: 15 December 2015 / Accepted: 28 January 2016 / Published: 6 February 2016
Dietary intake and higher serum concentrations of lycopene have been associated with lower incidence of prostate cancer and other chronic diseases. Identifying determinants of serum lycopene concentrations may thus have important public health implications. Prior studies have suggested that serum lycopene concentrations are under partial genetic control. The goal of this research was to identify genetic predictors of serum lycopene concentrations using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach among a sample of 441 Old Order Amish adults that consumed a controlled diet. Linear regression models were utilized to evaluate associations between genetic variants and serum concentrations of lycopene. Variant rs7680948 on chromosome 4, located in the intron region of the SETD7 gene, was significantly associated with serum lycopene concentrations (p = 3.41 × 10−9). Our findings also provided nominal support for the association previously noted between SCARB1 and serum lycopene concentrations, although with a different SNP (rs11057841) in the region. This study identified a novel locus associated with serum lycopene concentrations and our results raise a number of intriguing possibilities regarding the nature of the relationship between SETD7 and lycopene, both of which have been independently associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into this relationship might help provide greater mechanistic understanding of these associations. View Full-Text
Keywords: lycopene; carotenoids; genome-wide association study (GWAS); SETD7; SCARB1; Old Order Amish; prostate cancer lycopene; carotenoids; genome-wide association study (GWAS); SETD7; SCARB1; Old Order Amish; prostate cancer
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D’Adamo, C.R.; D’Urso, A.; Ryan, K.A.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Semba, R.D.; Steinle, N.I.; Mitchell, B.D.; Shuldiner, A.R.; McArdle, P.F. A Common Variant in the SETD7 Gene Predicts Serum Lycopene Concentrations. Nutrients 2016, 8, 82.

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