Next Article in Journal
Target Fortification of Breast Milk: How Often Should Milk Analysis Be Done?
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Acute Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Previous Article in Special Issue
Plant Ferritin—A Source of Iron to Prevent Its Deficiency
Open AccessReview

Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB) in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

Molecular Pharmacology and Pathology Program, Department of Pathology and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2015, 7(4), 2274-2296; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7042274
Received: 25 October 2014 / Revised: 3 March 2015 / Accepted: 5 March 2015 / Published: 31 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Deficiency: Development, Implications and Treatment)
Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron) on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB); may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism. View Full-Text
Keywords: DCYTB; CYBRD1; vitamin C; cytochrome b561; iron homeostasis; anemia; mouse model; HIF2α; IRP1 DCYTB; CYBRD1; vitamin C; cytochrome b561; iron homeostasis; anemia; mouse model; HIF2α; IRP1
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lane, D.J.R.; Bae, D.-H.; Merlot, A.M.; Sahni, S.; Richardson, D.R. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB) in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation. Nutrients 2015, 7, 2274-2296.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop