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Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome

Cleveland Clinic, Wellness Institute, 1950 Richmond Road/TR2-203, Lyndhurst, OH 44124, USA
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Nutrients 2013, 5(8), 3299-3310; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5083299
Received: 2 June 2013 / Revised: 30 July 2013 / Accepted: 8 August 2013 / Published: 19 August 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Docosahexaenoic Acid and Human Health)
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been used to treat a range of different conditions, including periodontal disease (PD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That DHA helps with these oral and gastrointestinal diseases in which inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis play key roles, raises the question of whether DHA may assist in the prevention or treatment of other inflammatory conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome, which have also been linked with inflammation and alterations in normal host microbial populations. Here we review established and investigated associations between DHA, PD, and IBD. We conclude that by beneficially altering cytokine production and macrophage recruitment, the composition of intestinal microbiota and intestinal integrity, lipopolysaccharide- and adipose-induced inflammation, and insulin signaling, DHA may be a key tool in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. View Full-Text
Keywords: inflammation; periodontal disease; inflammatory bowel disease; metabolic syndrome; bacterial dysbiosis; microbiome; DHA; docosahexaenoic acid; omega-3; fatty acid inflammation; periodontal disease; inflammatory bowel disease; metabolic syndrome; bacterial dysbiosis; microbiome; DHA; docosahexaenoic acid; omega-3; fatty acid
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tabbaa, M.; Golubic, M.; Roizen, M.F.; Bernstein, A.M. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2013, 5, 3299-3310. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5083299

AMA Style

Tabbaa M, Golubic M, Roizen MF, Bernstein AM. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients. 2013; 5(8):3299-3310. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5083299

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tabbaa, Maria, Mladen Golubic, Michael F. Roizen, and Adam M. Bernstein 2013. "Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome" Nutrients 5, no. 8: 3299-3310. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5083299

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