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Major Cereal Grain Fibers and Psyllium in Relation to Cardiovascular Health

Cleveland Clinic, Wellness Institute, 1950 Richmond Road/TR2-203, Lyndhurst, OH 44124, USA
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Nutrients 2013, 5(5), 1471-1487; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5051471
Received: 27 February 2013 / Revised: 30 March 2013 / Accepted: 16 April 2013 / Published: 29 April 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Nutrition)
Numerous studies reveal the cardiovascular benefits of consuming dietary fiber and, especially, cereal fiber. Cereal fiber is associated with cardiovascular risk reduction through multiple mechanisms and consuming a variety of cereal fiber sources offers health benefits specific to the source. Certain cereal fibers have been studied more extensively than others and provide greater support for their incorporation into a healthful diet. β-glucan from oats or barley, or a combination of whole oats and barley, and soluble fiber from psyllium reduces the risk of coronary heart disease; inulin-type fructans added to foods and beverages may modestly decrease serum triacylglycerols; arabinoxylan and resistant starch may improve glycemic control. Individuals with low cereal fiber intake should increase their intake of whole grains in order to receive the benefits of whole grains in addition to fiber. For those adjusting to the texture and palatability of whole grains, turning to added-fiber products rich in β-glucan and psyllium may allow them to reach their fiber goals without increasing caloric intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: cereal; fiber; cardiovascular disease; heart disease; beta-glucan; psyllium; arabinoxylan; fructan; resistant starch cereal; fiber; cardiovascular disease; heart disease; beta-glucan; psyllium; arabinoxylan; fructan; resistant starch
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Bernstein, A.M.; Titgemeier, B.; Kirkpatrick, K.; Golubic, M.; Roizen, M.F. Major Cereal Grain Fibers and Psyllium in Relation to Cardiovascular Health. Nutrients 2013, 5, 1471-1487.

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