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Article

Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Nutritional Status and Physical Activity Levels and a Sports Injury Reported in Children: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study

1
Department of General and Applied Kinesiology, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Sport Motorics and Methodology in Kinanthropology, Faculty of Sports Studies, Masaryk University, 61 137 Brno, Czech Republic
3
RECETOX, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61 137 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sadia Afrin
Nutrients 2022, 14(4), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040870
Received: 14 January 2022 / Revised: 9 February 2022 / Accepted: 15 February 2022 / Published: 18 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition in Women)
Objective: Our aim was to analyze dose–response associations between maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and physical activity levels with childhood sports injury rates. Methods: Participants included pre-pregnant mothers (n = 4811) and their children at the age of 7 years (n = 3311). Maternal anthropometry (height, weight, and body mass index), time spent in physical activity, and education level were recorded. All sports injuries were defined as injuries reported in the past year by the children at the age of 7 years. Results: Children whose mothers were overweight/obese in the pre-pregnancy period were 2.04 (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.12–3.71) times more likely to report a sports injury at the age of 7 years. Underweight mothers exhibited a 74% decrease in the odds of their children reporting a sports injury at follow-up (OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.10–0.68). Finally, an increase in maternal physical activity across the last three quartiles was associated with a lower odds of sports injuries. Conclusions: The risk of reporting a sports injury was greater for children whose mothers were overweight/obese in the pre-pregnancy period. However, there was a lower risk with both maternal underweight status and increasing minutes of physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: body mass index; physical activity; sports injury; longitudinal analysis; children body mass index; physical activity; sports injury; longitudinal analysis; children
MDPI and ACS Style

Kasović, M.; Štefan, L.; Piler, P.; Zvonar, M. Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Nutritional Status and Physical Activity Levels and a Sports Injury Reported in Children: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study. Nutrients 2022, 14, 870. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040870

AMA Style

Kasović M, Štefan L, Piler P, Zvonar M. Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Nutritional Status and Physical Activity Levels and a Sports Injury Reported in Children: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study. Nutrients. 2022; 14(4):870. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040870

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kasović, Mario, Lovro Štefan, Pavel Piler, and Martin Zvonar. 2022. "Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Nutritional Status and Physical Activity Levels and a Sports Injury Reported in Children: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study" Nutrients 14, no. 4: 870. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14040870

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