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Communication

Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study

1
Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, EpiHubben, MTC-huset, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden
2
Preventive Medicine Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, 141 52 Stockholm, Sweden
4
School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, 791 31 Falun, Sweden
5
Unit of Cardiovascular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
6
Unit of Medical Epidemiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Silvio Borrelli
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030509
Received: 7 January 2022 / Revised: 22 January 2022 / Accepted: 23 January 2022 / Published: 25 January 2022
Elevated circulating copper levels have been associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), kidney damage, and decline in kidney function. Using a two sample Mendelian randomization approach where copper-associated genetic variants were used as instrumental variables, genetically predicted higher circulating copper levels were associated with higher CKD prevalence (odds ratio 1.17; 95% confidence interval 1.04, 1.32; p-value = 0.009). There was suggestive evidence that genetically predicted higher copper was associated with a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and a more rapid kidney damage decline. In conclusion, we observed that elevated circulating copper levels may be a causal risk factor for CKD. View Full-Text
Keywords: circulating nutrients; kidney related disease; estimated glomerular filtration rate; Mendelian randomization circulating nutrients; kidney related disease; estimated glomerular filtration rate; Mendelian randomization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ahmad, S.; Ärnlöv, J.; Larsson, S.C. Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Nutrients 2022, 14, 509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030509

AMA Style

Ahmad S, Ärnlöv J, Larsson SC. Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Nutrients. 2022; 14(3):509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030509

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahmad, Shafqat, Johan Ärnlöv, and Susanna C. Larsson. 2022. "Genetically Predicted Circulating Copper and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study" Nutrients 14, no. 3: 509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030509

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