Next Article in Journal
Young Adults with Higher Salt Intake Have Inferior Hydration Status: A Cross-Sectional Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Prader–Willi Syndrome: Possibilities of Weight Gain Prevention and Treatment
Previous Article in Journal
Illustration of the Importance of Adjustment for within- and between-Person Variability in Dietary Intake Surveys for Assessment of Population Risk of Micronutrient Deficiency/Excess Using an Example Data Set
Previous Article in Special Issue
Promoting Fruit and Vegetable Consumption for Childhood Obesity Prevention
 
 
Article

Tryptophan Metabolism Is Associated with BMI and Adipose Tissue Mass and Linked to Metabolic Disease in Pediatric Obesity

Clinical Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Allergology and Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Comprehensive Center for Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, 1190 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Dénes Molnár, Éva Erhardt and Ekhard E. Ziegler
Nutrients 2022, 14(2), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020286
Received: 12 November 2021 / Revised: 3 January 2022 / Accepted: 7 January 2022 / Published: 11 January 2022
The obesity epidemic has contributed to an escalating prevalence of metabolic diseases in children. Overnutrition leads to increased tryptophan uptake and availability. An association between the induction of the tryptophan catabolic pathway via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity and obesity-related inflammation has been observed. This study aimed to investigate the impact of pediatric obesity on tryptophan metabolism and the potential relationship with metabolic disease. In this prospective cohort study, plasma kynurenine, tryptophan, and serotonin levels were measured by ELISA, and IDO activity was estimated by calculating the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in a clinically characterized population with severe obesity (BMI ≥ 97th percentile) aged 9 to 19 (n = 125). IDO activity and its product kynurenine correlated with BMI z-score and body fat mass, whereas concentrations of serotonin, the alternative tryptophan metabolite, negatively correlated with these measures of adiposity. Kynurenine and tryptophan, but not serotonin levels, were associated with disturbed glucose metabolism. Tryptophan concentrations negatively correlated with adiponectin and were significantly higher in prediabetes and metabolically unhealthy obesity. In conclusion, BMI and body fat mass were associated with increased tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway and decreased serotonin production in children and adolescents with severe obesity. The resulting elevated kynurenine levels may contribute to metabolic disease in obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood; aromatic amino acids; inflammation; prediabetes; metabolically healthy obesity; indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase childhood; aromatic amino acids; inflammation; prediabetes; metabolically healthy obesity; indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lischka, J.; Schanzer, A.; Baumgartner, M.; de Gier, C.; Greber-Platzer, S.; Zeyda, M. Tryptophan Metabolism Is Associated with BMI and Adipose Tissue Mass and Linked to Metabolic Disease in Pediatric Obesity. Nutrients 2022, 14, 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020286

AMA Style

Lischka J, Schanzer A, Baumgartner M, de Gier C, Greber-Platzer S, Zeyda M. Tryptophan Metabolism Is Associated with BMI and Adipose Tissue Mass and Linked to Metabolic Disease in Pediatric Obesity. Nutrients. 2022; 14(2):286. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020286

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lischka, Julia, Andrea Schanzer, Margot Baumgartner, Charlotte de Gier, Susanne Greber-Platzer, and Maximilian Zeyda. 2022. "Tryptophan Metabolism Is Associated with BMI and Adipose Tissue Mass and Linked to Metabolic Disease in Pediatric Obesity" Nutrients 14, no. 2: 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020286

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop