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Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Protects against Antibiotic-Induced Functional and Compositional Changes in Human Fecal Microbiome

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Department of Family Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA
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Department of Human Science, School of Nursing and Health Studies, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057, USA
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Institute for Genomic Sciences, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
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Department of Food Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
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Department of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
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Dairy & Food Culture Technologies, Centennial, CO 80122, USA
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Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Henry J. Thompson
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2814; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082814
Received: 27 July 2021 / Accepted: 11 August 2021 / Published: 17 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Prebiotics and Probiotics)
The administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics is often associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and impacts gastrointestinal tract homeostasis, as evidenced by the following: (a) an overall reduction in both the numbers and diversity of the gut microbiota, and (b) decreased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Evidence in humans that probiotics may enhance the recovery of microbiota populations after antibiotic treatment is equivocal, and few studies have addressed if probiotics improve the recovery of microbial metabolic function. Our aim was to determine if Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12)-containing yogurt could protect against antibiotic-induced fecal SCFA and microbiota composition disruptions. We conducted a randomized, allocation-concealed, controlled trial of amoxicillin/clavulanate administration (days 1–7), in conjunction with either BB-12-containing or control yogurt (days 1–14). We measured the fecal levels of SCFAs and bacterial composition at baseline and days 7, 14, 21, and 30. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to the BB-12 group, and 20 participants to the control group. Antibiotic treatment suppressed the fecal acetate levels in both the control and probiotic groups. Following the cessation of antibiotics, the fecal acetate levels in the probiotic group increased over the remainder of the study and returned to the baseline levels on day 30 (−1.6% baseline), whereas, in the control group, the acetate levels remained suppressed. Further, antibiotic treatment reduced the Shannon diversity of the gut microbiota, for all the study participants at day 7. The magnitude of this change was larger and more sustained in the control group compared to the probiotic group, which is consistent with the hypothesis that BB-12 enhanced microbiota recovery. There were no significant baseline clinical differences between the two groups. Concurrent administration of amoxicillin/clavulanate and BB-12 yogurt, to healthy subjects, was associated with a significantly smaller decrease in the fecal SCFA levels and a more stable taxonomic profile of the microbiota over time than the control group. View Full-Text
Keywords: abundance; antibiotic-induced perturbation; diversity; gut microbiota; probiotic; Bifidobacterium; short-chain fatty acid abundance; antibiotic-induced perturbation; diversity; gut microbiota; probiotic; Bifidobacterium; short-chain fatty acid
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MDPI and ACS Style

Merenstein, D.; Fraser, C.M.; Roberts, R.F.; Liu, T.; Grant-Beurmann, S.; Tan, T.P.; Smith, K.H.; Cronin, T.; Martin, O.A.; Sanders, M.E.; Lucan, S.C.; Kane, M.A. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Protects against Antibiotic-Induced Functional and Compositional Changes in Human Fecal Microbiome. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2814. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082814

AMA Style

Merenstein D, Fraser CM, Roberts RF, Liu T, Grant-Beurmann S, Tan TP, Smith KH, Cronin T, Martin OA, Sanders ME, Lucan SC, Kane MA. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Protects against Antibiotic-Induced Functional and Compositional Changes in Human Fecal Microbiome. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2814. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082814

Chicago/Turabian Style

Merenstein, Daniel, Claire M. Fraser, Robert F. Roberts, Tian Liu, Silvia Grant-Beurmann, Tina P. Tan, Keisha H. Smith, Tom Cronin, Olivia A. Martin, Mary E. Sanders, Sean C. Lucan, and Maureen A. Kane. 2021. "Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Protects against Antibiotic-Induced Functional and Compositional Changes in Human Fecal Microbiome" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2814. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082814

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