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Article

The Associations between Diet and Socioeconomic Disparities and the Intestinal Microbiome in Preadolescence

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Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, The Sackler Faculty, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6139001, Israel
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The Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6139001, Israel
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Nutrition Division, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem 9101002, Israel
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Department of Pediatrics, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera 3810101, Israel
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Adelson School of Medicine, Ariel University, Ariel 4077625, Israel
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Laboratory of Teratology, Department of Medical Neurobiology, The Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 9112002, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Riadh Hammami
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2645; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082645
Received: 30 June 2021 / Revised: 26 July 2021 / Accepted: 28 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactives, Gut Microbiota, and Human Health)
The intestinal microbiome continues to shift and develop throughout youth and could play a pivotal role in health and wellbeing throughout adulthood. Environmental and interpersonal determinants are strong mediators of the intestinal microbiome during the rapid growth period of preadolescence. We aim to delineate associations between the gut microbiome composition, body mass index (BMI), dietary intake and socioeconomic status (SES) in a cohort of ethnically homogenous preadolescents. This cohort included 139 Arab children aged 10–12 years, from varying socioeconomic strata. Dietary intake was assessed using the 24-h recall method. The intestinal microbiome was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Microbial composition was associated with SES, showing an overrepresentation of Prevotella and Eubacterium in children with lower SES. Higher BMI was associated with lower microbial diversity and altered taxonomic composition, including higher levels of Collinsella, especially among participants from lower SES. Intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids was the strongest predictor of bacterial alterations, including an independent association with Lachnobacterium and Lactobacillus. This study demonstrates that the intestinal microbiome in preadolescents is associated with socioeconomic determinants, BMI and dietary intake, specifically with higher consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Thus, tailored interventions during these crucial years have the potential to improve health disparities throughout the lifespan. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiome; dietary intake; school age; socioeconomic status; obesity microbiome; dietary intake; school age; socioeconomic status; obesity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lapidot, Y.; Reshef, L.; Goldsmith, R.; Na’amnih, W.; Kassem, E.; Ornoy, A.; Gophna, U.; Muhsen, K. The Associations between Diet and Socioeconomic Disparities and the Intestinal Microbiome in Preadolescence. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2645. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082645

AMA Style

Lapidot Y, Reshef L, Goldsmith R, Na’amnih W, Kassem E, Ornoy A, Gophna U, Muhsen K. The Associations between Diet and Socioeconomic Disparities and the Intestinal Microbiome in Preadolescence. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2645. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082645

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lapidot, Yelena, Leah Reshef, Rebecca Goldsmith, Wasef Na’amnih, Eias Kassem, Asher Ornoy, Uri Gophna, and Khitam Muhsen. 2021. "The Associations between Diet and Socioeconomic Disparities and the Intestinal Microbiome in Preadolescence" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2645. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082645

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