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Article

A Novel Personalized Systems Nutrition Program Improves Dietary Patterns, Lifestyle Behaviors and Health-Related Outcomes: Results from the Habit Study

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TNO, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, 3704 HE Zeist, The Netherlands
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Winters Nutrition Associates, S Abington Township, PA 18411, USA
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Katalyses, LLC, Ankeny, IA 50023, USA
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Independent Researcher, Elmhurst, IL 60126, USA
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Habit, Oakland, CA 94607, USA
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Campbell Soup Company, Camden, NJ 08103, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address is Nlumn LLC, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA.
Academic Editor: Thomas Skurk
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1763; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061763
Received: 30 March 2021 / Revised: 14 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 22 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Personalized nutrition may be more effective in changing lifestyle behaviors compared to population-based guidelines. This single-arm exploratory study evaluated the impact of a 10-week personalized systems nutrition (PSN) program on lifestyle behavior and health outcomes. Healthy men and women (n = 82) completed the trial. Individuals were grouped into seven diet types, for which phenotypic, genotypic and behavioral data were used to generate personalized recommendations. Behavior change guidance was also provided. The intervention reduced the intake of calories (−256.2 kcal; p < 0.0001), carbohydrates (−22.1 g; p < 0.0039), sugar (−13.0 g; p < 0.0001), total fat (−17.3 g; p < 0.0001), saturated fat (−5.9 g; p = 0.0003) and PUFA (−2.5 g; p = 0.0065). Additionally, BMI (−0.6 kg/m2; p < 0.0001), body fat (−1.2%; p = 0.0192) and hip circumference (−5.8 cm; p < 0.0001) were decreased after the intervention. In the subgroup with the lowest phenotypic flexibility, a measure of the body’s ability to adapt to environmental stressors, LDL (−0.44 mmol/L; p = 0.002) and total cholesterol (−0.49 mmol/L; p < 0.0001) were reduced after the intervention. This study shows that a PSN program in a workforce improves lifestyle habits and reduces body weight, BMI and other health-related outcomes. Health improvement was most pronounced in the compromised phenotypic flexibility subgroup, which indicates that a PSN program may be effective in targeting behavior change in health-compromised target groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: personalized nutrition; healthy lifestyle; systems biology; dietary intervention; mixed meal tolerance test personalized nutrition; healthy lifestyle; systems biology; dietary intervention; mixed meal tolerance test
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MDPI and ACS Style

de Hoogh, I.M.; Winters, B.L.; Nieman, K.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Krone, T.; van den Broek, T.J.; Anderson, B.D.; Caspers, M.P.M.; Anthony, J.C.; Wopereis, S. A Novel Personalized Systems Nutrition Program Improves Dietary Patterns, Lifestyle Behaviors and Health-Related Outcomes: Results from the Habit Study. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061763

AMA Style

de Hoogh IM, Winters BL, Nieman KM, Bijlsma S, Krone T, van den Broek TJ, Anderson BD, Caspers MPM, Anthony JC, Wopereis S. A Novel Personalized Systems Nutrition Program Improves Dietary Patterns, Lifestyle Behaviors and Health-Related Outcomes: Results from the Habit Study. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061763

Chicago/Turabian Style

de Hoogh, Iris M., Barbara L. Winters, Kristin M. Nieman, Sabina Bijlsma, Tanja Krone, Tim J. van den Broek, Barbara D. Anderson, Martien P. M. Caspers, Joshua C. Anthony, and Suzan Wopereis. 2021. "A Novel Personalized Systems Nutrition Program Improves Dietary Patterns, Lifestyle Behaviors and Health-Related Outcomes: Results from the Habit Study" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061763

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